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Open AccessArticle

Tangsa and Wancho of North-East India Use Animals not only as Food and Medicine but also as Additional Cultural Attributes

1
Biochemical Nutrition Laboratory, Department of Zoology, Rajiv Gandhi University, Itanagar, Arunachal Pradesh 791112, India
2
Department of Plant Medicals, Andong National University, Andong GB 36729, Korea
3
Department of Ecology and Genetics, Oulu University, FIN 90140 Oulu, Finland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Foods 2020, 9(4), 528; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9040528
Received: 25 March 2020 / Revised: 17 April 2020 / Accepted: 20 April 2020 / Published: 22 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Ethnobiology of Wild Foods)
Cultural and ritual uses of animals beyond those for food and medicine should not be dismissed if we wish to understand the pressure that wildlife is under. We documented such uses for the Tangsa and Wancho tribals of Eastern Arunachal Pradesh (India). Group discussions with assembled members of 10 accessible villages in each of the tribal areas were carried out in 2015 and 2016. Vernacular names of culturally important species were noted and details of hunting practices were recorded. The different uses of animals and their parts during rituals and festivals and their significance in decorations and adornments, in supernatural beliefs and in connection with tribal folklore (stories) are documented. Folklore helps us understand why some species are hunted and consumed while others for no apparent reason are killed or simply ignored. Similarities as well as differences between the two tribes were recorded and possible reasons for the differences are given. The roles that the government as well as the tribal leaders play to halt or slow down the erosion and gradual disappearance of traditions that define the two cultures without losing already rare and endangered species are highlighted. View Full-Text
Keywords: common knowledge; traditional wisdom; North-East Indian tribals; Arunachal Pradesh; ethnobiology common knowledge; traditional wisdom; North-East Indian tribals; Arunachal Pradesh; ethnobiology
MDPI and ACS Style

Jugli, S.; Chakravorty, J.; Meyer-Rochow, V.B. Tangsa and Wancho of North-East India Use Animals not only as Food and Medicine but also as Additional Cultural Attributes. Foods 2020, 9, 528.

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