Next Article in Journal
Spices in a Product Affect Emotions: A Study with an Extruded Snack Product
Next Article in Special Issue
Mechanisms of Antimicrobial Action of Cinnamon and Oregano Oils, Cinnamaldehyde, Carvacrol, 2,5-Dihydroxybenzaldehyde, and 2-Hydroxy-5-Methoxybenzaldehyde against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map)
Previous Article in Journal
Antioxidants in Food: The Significance of Characterisation, Identification, Chemical and Biological Assays in Determining the Role of Antioxidants in Food
Previous Article in Special Issue
The Chemical Compositions of the Volatile Oils of Garlic (Allium sativum) and Wild Garlic (Allium vineale)
Article Menu
Issue 8 (August) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessCommunication
Foods 2017, 6(8), 69; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods6080069

Application of Surfactant Micelle-Entrapped Eugenol for Prevention of Growth of the Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli in Ground Beef

1
Department of Animal Science, Texas A & M University, College Station, TX 77843-2471, USA
2
Department of Nutrition and Food Science, Texas A & M University, College Station, TX 77843-2253, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 20 July 2017 / Revised: 4 August 2017 / Accepted: 14 August 2017 / Published: 16 August 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Essential Oils in Food Systems)
Full-Text   |   PDF [593 KB, uploaded 16 August 2017]   |  

Abstract

Beef safety may be compromised by O157 and non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) contamination. The capacity of surfactant micelles loaded with the plant-derived antimicrobial eugenol to reduce STEC on beef trimmings that were later ground and refrigerated for five days at 5 ± 1 °C was tested to determine their utility for beef safety protection. STEC-inoculated trimmings were treated with free eugenol, micelle-encapsulated eugenol, 2% lactic acid (55 °C), sterile distilled water (25 °C), or left untreated (control). Following treatment, trimmings were coarse-ground and stored aerobically at 5 ± 1 °C. Ground beef was then sampled for STEC immediately post-grinding, and again at three and five days of storage. STEC minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) in liquid medium for free eugenol and 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-loaded micelles were 0.5% and 0.125%, respectively. STEC numbers on beef trimmings treated by sterile water (6.5 log10 CFU/g), free eugenol (6.5 log10 CFU/g), micelle-loaded eugenol (6.4 log10 CFU/g), and lactic acid (6.4 log10 CFU/g) did not differ compared to untreated controls (6.6 log10 CFU/g) (p = 0.982). Conversely, STEC were significantly reduced by refrigerated storage (0.2 and 0.3 log10 CFU/g at three and five days of storage, respectively) (p = 0.014). Antimicrobial treatments did not significantly decontaminate ground beef, indicating their low utility for beef safety protection. View Full-Text
Keywords: plant-derived antimicrobial; micelles; non-O157 STEC; E. coli O157:H7; ground beef; beef safety; eugenol plant-derived antimicrobial; micelles; non-O157 STEC; E. coli O157:H7; ground beef; beef safety; eugenol
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Tolen, T.N.; Ruengvisesh, S.; Taylor, T.M. Application of Surfactant Micelle-Entrapped Eugenol for Prevention of Growth of the Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli in Ground Beef. Foods 2017, 6, 69.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Foods EISSN 2304-8158 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top