Next Article in Journal
Investigations on Backflush Cleaning of Spent Grain-Contaminated Filter Cloths Using Continuous and Pulsed Jets
Next Article in Special Issue
Multivariate Nature of Fish Freshness Evaluation by Consumers
Previous Article in Journal
Editorial for the Special Issue, “Quality Assay, Processing and Bio-Function of Rice Products”
Previous Article in Special Issue
Dietary Behaviours of University Students during the COVID-19 Pandemic. A Comparative Analysis of Nursing and Engineering Students
 
 
Article

Why Being ‘Stressed’ Is ‘Desserts’ in Reverse—The Effect of Acute Psychosocial Stress on Food Pleasure and Food Choice

1
Food Quality Perception and Society Team, iSense Lab, Department of Food Science, Faculty of Technical Sciences, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus, Denmark
2
Sino-Danish College (SDC), University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 101408, China
3
Department of Psychology and Behavioral Sciences, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus, Denmark
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Cristina Calvo-Porral
Foods 2022, 11(12), 1756; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11121756
Received: 23 May 2022 / Revised: 10 June 2022 / Accepted: 10 June 2022 / Published: 15 June 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Consumer Behavior and Food Choice—Volume II)
The link between acute stress, food pleasure and eating behavior in humans by employing measures of individual reward mechanisms has not been investigated as of yet. Having these insights is key to understanding why many people experience a change in eating behavior when experiencing stress. Thirty-five Danes (mean age 21.71 years) underwent a stress-inducing and relaxation-inducing task based on a randomized cross-over study design. Both tasks were combined with the Leeds Food Preference Questionnaire, to investigate the effect of stress on specific measures of food reward. Furthermore, participants chose a snack, as a covert measure of actual food choice. The study found no effect on explicit liking, explicit wanting or relative preference. For implicit wanting, an effect was detected on high-fat sweet foods, with increasing scores for the stress-induced condition. Moreover, 54% chose a different snack following the stress-inducing condition. Interestingly, 14% chose to change their snack choice to no snack at all. Results suggest acute psychosocial stress can increase cravings for highly palatable foods for some, while for others an experience of loss of appetite prevails. Overall, this study points to a further understanding of why consumers have issues with making healthy food choices, ultimately affecting public health too. View Full-Text
Keywords: food pleasure; food reward; stress; Leeds Food Preference Questionnaire; wanting; liking food pleasure; food reward; stress; Leeds Food Preference Questionnaire; wanting; liking
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Hyldelund, N.B.; Dalgaard, V.L.; Byrne, D.V.; Andersen, B.V. Why Being ‘Stressed’ Is ‘Desserts’ in Reverse—The Effect of Acute Psychosocial Stress on Food Pleasure and Food Choice. Foods 2022, 11, 1756. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11121756

AMA Style

Hyldelund NB, Dalgaard VL, Byrne DV, Andersen BV. Why Being ‘Stressed’ Is ‘Desserts’ in Reverse—The Effect of Acute Psychosocial Stress on Food Pleasure and Food Choice. Foods. 2022; 11(12):1756. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11121756

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hyldelund, Nikoline Bach, Vita Ligaya Dalgaard, Derek Victor Byrne, and Barbara Vad Andersen. 2022. "Why Being ‘Stressed’ Is ‘Desserts’ in Reverse—The Effect of Acute Psychosocial Stress on Food Pleasure and Food Choice" Foods 11, no. 12: 1756. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11121756

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop