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Article

Lipoxygenase in Wheat: Genetic Control and Impact on Stability of Lutein and Lutein Esters

1
School of Agriculture Food and Wine, Waite Campus, The University of Adelaide, Urrbrae, SA 5064, Australia
2
SARDI, Waite Precinct, Urrbrae, SA 5064, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Dámaso Hornero-Méndez and Sergio G. Atienza
Foods 2021, 10(5), 1149; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10051149
Received: 1 April 2021 / Revised: 14 May 2021 / Accepted: 17 May 2021 / Published: 20 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carotenoid Esters in Foods)
Preservation of lutein concentrations in wheat-based end-products during processing is important both for product quality and nutritional value. A key constituent involved in lutein degradation is endogenous lipoxygenase. Lutein and lutein ester concentrations were compared at intervals during storage of noodle sheets prepared from flour of wheat varieties representing a range in lipoxygenase activity, as well as in different mill streams and in different grain tissues. Higher lipoxygenase concentration was associated with an increased loss of free lutein and lutein mono-esters whereas lutein diesters appeared to be more resistant to degradation. Lutein degradation was reduced in the presence of a lipoxygenase inhibitor, when noodle sheets were heated to destroy enzyme activity or when pH was increased. In addition, three populations were used to investigate the genetic control of lipoxygenase. A previously reported mutation of Lpx-B1.1 was associated with a reduction in activity from high to intermediate whilst a new locus on chromosome 4D was associated with variation between intermediate and near-zero. The gene underlying the 4D locus is a putative lipoxygenase. Stability of lutein could be improved by deployment of the mutations at the 4B and 4D loci and/or by post-harvest storage of grain under conditions that promote esterification. View Full-Text
Keywords: lipoxygenase genes; Asian noodle colour; genetic loci; molecular markers lipoxygenase genes; Asian noodle colour; genetic loci; molecular markers
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mares, D.J.; Cheong, J.; Goonetilleke, S.N.; Mather, D.E. Lipoxygenase in Wheat: Genetic Control and Impact on Stability of Lutein and Lutein Esters. Foods 2021, 10, 1149. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10051149

AMA Style

Mares DJ, Cheong J, Goonetilleke SN, Mather DE. Lipoxygenase in Wheat: Genetic Control and Impact on Stability of Lutein and Lutein Esters. Foods. 2021; 10(5):1149. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10051149

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mares, Daryl J., Judy Cheong, Shashi N. Goonetilleke, and Diane E. Mather 2021. "Lipoxygenase in Wheat: Genetic Control and Impact on Stability of Lutein and Lutein Esters" Foods 10, no. 5: 1149. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10051149

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