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Article

Pulsed Electric Field (PEF) Processing of Chilled and Frozen-Thawed Lamb Meat Cuts: Relationships between Sensory Characteristics and Chemical Composition of Meat

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Department of Food Science, Faculty of Health and Environment Sciences, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland 1010, New Zealand
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Key Laboratory of Agro-Products Processing, Institute of Food Science and Technology, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs, Beijing 100193, China
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Department of Food Science, University of Otago, PO Box 56, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand
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Riddet Institute, Massey University, Palmerston North 4472, New Zealand
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AgResearch MIRINZ, Ruakura Research Centre, Private Bag 3123, Hamilton 3240, New Zealand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Tomas Bolumar
Foods 2021, 10(5), 1148; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10051148
Received: 8 March 2021 / Revised: 10 May 2021 / Accepted: 16 May 2021 / Published: 20 May 2021
The effect of PEF processing and chilled storage on the volatile composition and sensory properties of chilled and frozen lamb cuts was investigated in this study. Results showed that PEF-treated chilled and frozen lamb cuts varied in temporal flavour attributes with storage. Storage for 7 days resulted in oxidized flavour, while PEF treatments for all chilled and frozen cuts were associated with browned and livery flavour attributes. Partial least squares regression (PLSR) was applied to determine the predictive relationships between the volatile composition, fatty acid and amino acid profiles, and sensory responses for PEF treated lamb cuts. The results showed that some volatile compounds (2-nonanone, 2-pentylfuran, pyrrole, methyl pyrazine, 2-ethyl-3-methyl pyrazine, and thiophene) correlated well with the meaty and juicy flavour of PEF treated frozen lamb cuts. In PEF treated chilled lamb cuts, meaty and juicy flavours were associated with the presence of fatty acids (C18:0, SFA, 20:5(n-3), and n-3). In contrast, livery and browned perception of both PEF processed chilled and frozen lamb cuts were associated with the presence of amino acids (threonine, phenylalanine, isoleucine, tyrosine, and methionine), and some volatile compounds (heptanal, 2-ethylfuran, pyridine, dimethyl disulphide, dimethyl trisulphide, and 3,5-diethyl-2-methyl pyrazine). Overall, these results imply that careful consideration of type of meat cuts, PEF pre-treatment, and storage are important when subjecting lamb meat to PEF processing. View Full-Text
Keywords: pulsed electric field; lamb; sensory; temporal dominance of sensations; cuts; storage; meat pulsed electric field; lamb; sensory; temporal dominance of sensations; cuts; storage; meat
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kantono, K.; Hamid, N.; Chadha, D.; Ma, Q.; Oey, I.; Farouk, M.M. Pulsed Electric Field (PEF) Processing of Chilled and Frozen-Thawed Lamb Meat Cuts: Relationships between Sensory Characteristics and Chemical Composition of Meat. Foods 2021, 10, 1148. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10051148

AMA Style

Kantono K, Hamid N, Chadha D, Ma Q, Oey I, Farouk MM. Pulsed Electric Field (PEF) Processing of Chilled and Frozen-Thawed Lamb Meat Cuts: Relationships between Sensory Characteristics and Chemical Composition of Meat. Foods. 2021; 10(5):1148. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10051148

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kantono, Kevin, Nazimah Hamid, Diksha Chadha, Qianli Ma, Indrawati Oey, and Mustafa M. Farouk 2021. "Pulsed Electric Field (PEF) Processing of Chilled and Frozen-Thawed Lamb Meat Cuts: Relationships between Sensory Characteristics and Chemical Composition of Meat" Foods 10, no. 5: 1148. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10051148

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