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Open AccessArticle

Impact of Different Irrigant Agitation Methods on Bacterial Elimination from Infected Root Canals

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Department of Endodontics, School of Dentistry, Saint Joseph University, Beirut BP 17-5208, Lebanon
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Department of Conservative Dentistry and Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090, Austria
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Austrian Cluster for Tissue Regeneration, Vienna 1090, Austria
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Department of Endodontology, Dental School, Ghent University, Ghent B9000, Belgium
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Microbiology Laboratory, School of Pharmacy, Saint Joseph University, Beirut BP 17-5208, Lebanon
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Head, Department of Endodontics, School of Dentistry, Saint Joseph University, Beirut BP 17-5208, Lebanon
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Dent. J. 2019, 7(3), 64; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj7030064
Received: 12 May 2019 / Revised: 9 June 2019 / Accepted: 10 June 2019 / Published: 27 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser in Endodontics)
Activation techniques are essential for root canal disinfection but may result in incomplete removal of bacteria. The aim of our study was to assess the antibacterial action of sonically, ultrasonically and laser-activated irrigation and 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) on Enterococcus faecalis in an infected tooth. Forty-four extracted mandibular premolars were mechanically prepared, sterilized, and inoculated with E. faecalis for 1 week. Bacterial counts after inoculation were evaluated in 4 randomly chosen teeth, remaining root canals were divided into 4 groups. Group A: laser-activated irrigation by photon-induced photoacoustic streaming, Group B: the sonic irrigation by EDDY, Group C: ultrasonic irrigation by EndoUltra, and Group D: 5.25% NaOCl. Colony forming unit (CFU) counts were measured and Kolmogorov–Smirnov, Wilcoxon, Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney tests were used to determine differences. The mean of CFU was found to significantly decrease in group D, 2110 ± 1015.93 (p < 0.001). Changes in measurement levels followed the same trend over time in groups A 27.40 ± 30.15, B 81.3 ± 85.68 and C 44.40 ± 67.12 (p = 0.141). The average CFU after irrigation in all groups was significantly greater than 0. Within the limitations of this study, all activation techniques were superior to NaOCl 5.25% in reducing E. faecalis from the infected tooth model. View Full-Text
Keywords: biofilm; laser-activated irrigation; root canal irrigation; sonic activation; ultrasonic activation biofilm; laser-activated irrigation; root canal irrigation; sonic activation; ultrasonic activation
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Hage, W.; De Moor, R.J.G.; Hajj, D.; Sfeir, G.; Sarkis, D.K.; Zogheib, C. Impact of Different Irrigant Agitation Methods on Bacterial Elimination from Infected Root Canals. Dent. J. 2019, 7, 64.

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