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Article

Young Adults’ Qualitative Self-Reports of Their Outcomes of Online Sexual Activities

1
School of Psychology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5, Canada
2
Department of Social Work, University of Gothenburg, 405 30 Göteborg, Sweden
3
Department of Psychology, Trent University, Peterborough, ON K9J 7B8, Canada
4
Institute of Media and Communication Science, Ilmenau University of Technology, Ehrenbergstraße 29, 98693 Ilmenau, Germany
5
Department of Community Health and Social Sciences, CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy, New York, NY 10027, USA
6
Department of Psychology, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB E3B 5A3, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Inmaculada Méndez Mateo and María del Carmen Pérez-Fuentes
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2021, 11(2), 303-320; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe11020023
Received: 24 February 2021 / Revised: 25 March 2021 / Accepted: 27 March 2021 / Published: 30 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current and Emerging Aspects of Cybersexuality)
Online sexual activities (OSA) refer to Internet-based activities, behaviours, and materials that are sexual in nature. Many young adults engage in OSA, but report doing so infrequently. Most OSA outcome research has focused on negative effects of only some types of OSA (e.g., viewing pornography online). The goal of this study was to enhance knowledge on the range of OSA outcomes by qualitatively exploring young adults’ self-reported negative and positive outcomes from OSA experiences generally. University/College students from Canada (n = 246), Germany (n = 411), Sweden (n = 299), and the USA (n = 123) completed an online survey that included open-ended questions about “one of the most positive/negative effects that engaging in online sexual activities has had on your life”. More participants provided positive outcome responses than negative outcome responses. Qualitative analysis of the responses suggested a wide range of positive and negative outcome content that fit into seven bi-polar, higher-order themes: No Outcomes, Relationship Outcomes, Sexual Experience, Emotional Outcomes, Knowledge, Personal Outcomes, and Security. We found no variations in themes or their respective codes across the four countries. The findings suggests that researchers, educators, health care and psychology providers need to include multiple dimensions of positive and negative, personal and interpersonal, sexual and non-sexual OSA outcomes in their work View Full-Text
Keywords: online sexual activity; cybersexuality; cybersex; sexually explicit material online; online pornography online sexual activity; cybersexuality; cybersex; sexually explicit material online; online pornography
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MDPI and ACS Style

Courtice, E.L.; Shaughnessy, K.; Blom, K.; Asrat, Y.; Daneback, K.; Döring, N.; Grov, C.; Byers, E.S. Young Adults’ Qualitative Self-Reports of Their Outcomes of Online Sexual Activities. Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2021, 11, 303-320. https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe11020023

AMA Style

Courtice EL, Shaughnessy K, Blom K, Asrat Y, Daneback K, Döring N, Grov C, Byers ES. Young Adults’ Qualitative Self-Reports of Their Outcomes of Online Sexual Activities. European Journal of Investigation in Health, Psychology and Education. 2021; 11(2):303-320. https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe11020023

Chicago/Turabian Style

Courtice, Erin L., Krystelle Shaughnessy, Kristin Blom, Yodit Asrat, Kristian Daneback, Nicola Döring, Christian Grov, and E. S. Byers. 2021. "Young Adults’ Qualitative Self-Reports of Their Outcomes of Online Sexual Activities" European Journal of Investigation in Health, Psychology and Education 11, no. 2: 303-320. https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe11020023

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