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Article

Physical and Mechanical Characterization of Fibrin-Based Bioprinted Constructs Containing Drug-Releasing Microspheres for Neural Tissue Engineering Applications

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Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 2Y2, Canada
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Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 2Y2, Canada
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Division of Medical Sciences, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 2Y2, Canada
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Centre for Biomedical Research, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 2Y2, Canada
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School of Biomedical Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T1Z3, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Shreyas Kuddannaya
Processes 2021, 9(7), 1205; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr9071205
Received: 6 June 2021 / Revised: 2 July 2021 / Accepted: 9 July 2021 / Published: 13 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Hydrogel Scaffolding of Stem Cells)
Three-dimensional bioprinting can fabricate precisely controlled 3D tissue constructs. This process uses bioinks—specially tailored materials that support the survival of incorporated cells—to produce tissue constructs. The properties of bioinks, such as stiffness and porosity, should mimic those found in desired tissues to support specialized cell types. Previous studies by our group validated soft substrates for neuronal cultures using neural cells derived from human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). It is important to confirm that these bioprinted tissues possess mechanical properties similar to native neural tissues. Here, we assessed the physical and mechanical properties of bioprinted constructs generated from our novel microsphere containing bioink. We measured the elastic moduli of bioprinted constructs with and without microspheres using a modified Hertz model. The storage and loss modulus, viscosity, and shear rates were also measured. Physical properties such as microstructure, porosity, swelling, and biodegradability were also analyzed. Our results showed that the elastic modulus of constructs with microspheres was 1032 ± 59.7 Pascal (Pa), and without microspheres was 728 ± 47.6 Pa. Mechanical strength and printability were significantly enhanced with the addition of microspheres. Thus, incorporating microspheres provides mechanical reinforcement, which indicates their suitability for future applications in neural tissue engineering. View Full-Text
Keywords: 3D bioprinting; neural tissues; rheology; indentation; elastic modulus 3D bioprinting; neural tissues; rheology; indentation; elastic modulus
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sharma, R.; Kirsch, R.; Valente, K.P.; Perez, M.R.; Willerth, S.M. Physical and Mechanical Characterization of Fibrin-Based Bioprinted Constructs Containing Drug-Releasing Microspheres for Neural Tissue Engineering Applications. Processes 2021, 9, 1205. https://doi.org/10.3390/pr9071205

AMA Style

Sharma R, Kirsch R, Valente KP, Perez MR, Willerth SM. Physical and Mechanical Characterization of Fibrin-Based Bioprinted Constructs Containing Drug-Releasing Microspheres for Neural Tissue Engineering Applications. Processes. 2021; 9(7):1205. https://doi.org/10.3390/pr9071205

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sharma, Ruchi, Rebecca Kirsch, Karolina Papera Valente, Milena Restan Perez, and Stephanie Michelle Willerth. 2021. "Physical and Mechanical Characterization of Fibrin-Based Bioprinted Constructs Containing Drug-Releasing Microspheres for Neural Tissue Engineering Applications" Processes 9, no. 7: 1205. https://doi.org/10.3390/pr9071205

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