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Article

Chemical Recycling of WEEE Plastics—Production of High Purity Monocyclic Aromatic Chemicals

1
Fraunhofer Institute for Environmental, Safety and Energy Technology UMSICHT, Institute Branch Sulzbach-Rosenberg, An der Maxhütte 1, 92237 Sulzbach-Rosenberg, Germany
2
School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Daniel Vollprecht
Processes 2021, 9(3), 530; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr9030530
Received: 15 February 2021 / Revised: 8 March 2021 / Accepted: 9 March 2021 / Published: 16 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Technology of Waste Treatment)
More than 200 kg real waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) shredder residues from a German dismantling plant were treated at 650 °C in a demonstration scale thermochemical conversion plant. The focus within this work was the generation, purification, and analysis of pyrolysis oil. Subsequent filtration and fractional distillation were combined to yield basic chemicals in high purity. By means of fractional distillation, pure monocyclic aromatic fractions containing benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX aromatics) as well as styrene and α-methyl styrene were isolated for chemical recycling. Mass balances were determined, and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS) as well as energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) measurements provided data on the purity and halogen content of each fraction. This work shows that thermochemical conversion and the subsequent refining by fractional distillation is capable of recycling WEEE shredder residues, producing pure BTEX and other monocyclic aromatic fractions. A significant decrease of halogen content (up to 99%) was achieved with the applied methods. View Full-Text
Keywords: WEEE; chemical recycling; pyrolysis; recovery of aromatics; oil upgrading; dehalogenation WEEE; chemical recycling; pyrolysis; recovery of aromatics; oil upgrading; dehalogenation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Rieger, T.; Oey, J.C.; Palchyk, V.; Hofmann, A.; Franke, M.; Hornung, A. Chemical Recycling of WEEE Plastics—Production of High Purity Monocyclic Aromatic Chemicals. Processes 2021, 9, 530. https://doi.org/10.3390/pr9030530

AMA Style

Rieger T, Oey JC, Palchyk V, Hofmann A, Franke M, Hornung A. Chemical Recycling of WEEE Plastics—Production of High Purity Monocyclic Aromatic Chemicals. Processes. 2021; 9(3):530. https://doi.org/10.3390/pr9030530

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rieger, Tobias, Jessen C. Oey, Volodymyr Palchyk, Alexander Hofmann, Matthias Franke, and Andreas Hornung. 2021. "Chemical Recycling of WEEE Plastics—Production of High Purity Monocyclic Aromatic Chemicals" Processes 9, no. 3: 530. https://doi.org/10.3390/pr9030530

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