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Article

A Comparative Study of Interaction Time and Usability of Using Controllers and Hand Tracking in Virtual Reality Training

1
Informatic Innovation Center of Excellence (IICE), School of Informatics, Walailak University, Nakhon Si Thammarat 80160, Thailand
2
G-SCOP, Grenoble-INP, Université Grenoble Alpes, 38031 Grenoble, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Jiang Bian
Informatics 2021, 8(3), 60; https://doi.org/10.3390/informatics8030060
Received: 18 August 2021 / Revised: 3 September 2021 / Accepted: 8 September 2021 / Published: 13 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Medical and Clinical Informatics)
Virtual Reality (VR) technology is frequently applied in simulation, particularly in medical training. VR medical training often requires user input either from controllers or free-hand gestures. Nowadays, hand gestures are commonly tracked via built-in cameras from a VR headset. Like controllers, hand tracking can be used in VR applications to control virtual objects. This research developed VR intubation training as a case study and applied controllers and hand tracking for four interactions—namely collision, grabbing, pressing, and release. The quasi-experimental design assigned 30 medical students in clinical training to investigate the differences between using VR controller and hand tracking in medical interactions. The subjects were divided into two groups, one with VR controllers and the other with VR hand tracking, to study the interaction time and user satisfaction in seven procedures. System Usability Scale (SUS) and User Satisfaction Evaluation Questionnaire (USEQ) were used to measure user usability and satisfaction, respectively. The results showed that the interaction time of each procedure was not different. Similarly, according to SUS and USEQ scores, satisfaction and usability were also not different. Therefore, in VR intubation training, using hand tracking has no difference in results to using controllers. As medical training with free-hand gestures is more natural for real-world situations, hand tracking will play an important role as user input for VR medical training. This allows trainees to recognize and correct their postures intuitively, which is more beneficial for self-learning and practicing. View Full-Text
Keywords: virtual reality; hand tracking; VR interaction; usability; intubation training virtual reality; hand tracking; VR interaction; usability; intubation training
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MDPI and ACS Style

Khundam, C.; Vorachart, V.; Preeyawongsakul, P.; Hosap, W.; Noël, F. A Comparative Study of Interaction Time and Usability of Using Controllers and Hand Tracking in Virtual Reality Training. Informatics 2021, 8, 60. https://doi.org/10.3390/informatics8030060

AMA Style

Khundam C, Vorachart V, Preeyawongsakul P, Hosap W, Noël F. A Comparative Study of Interaction Time and Usability of Using Controllers and Hand Tracking in Virtual Reality Training. Informatics. 2021; 8(3):60. https://doi.org/10.3390/informatics8030060

Chicago/Turabian Style

Khundam, Chaowanan, Varunyu Vorachart, Patibut Preeyawongsakul, Witthaya Hosap, and Frédéric Noël. 2021. "A Comparative Study of Interaction Time and Usability of Using Controllers and Hand Tracking in Virtual Reality Training" Informatics 8, no. 3: 60. https://doi.org/10.3390/informatics8030060

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