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Open AccessArticle

Nanoparticle-Surface Interactions in Geometrical Separation Devices

1
Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375, USA
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Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology, Alexandria, VA 22312, USA
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Biomedical Engineering, Lawrence Technical University, Southfield, MI 48075, USA
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Information Delivery Systems, Bowie, MD 20720, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Former Address through SEAP internship: Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375, USA.
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Former Address: Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375, USA.
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Former Address through NOVA Research Inc. Alexandria, VA 22308, USA: Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375, USA.
Academic Editor: Frank L. Dorman
Chromatography 2015, 2(3), 567-579; https://doi.org/10.3390/chromatography2030567
Received: 24 June 2015 / Revised: 31 July 2015 / Accepted: 3 September 2015 / Published: 11 September 2015
This study sought to demonstrate the impact of surface-target interactions in a device bearing geometrical features through evaluations of chemical modification to the surface and alteration of the charge state of both surface and targets. The movement of commercial fluorescent nanoparticles through a field of geometric features was monitored based on the output of the field measured at different points transverse to the direction of flow. Modification of the device surfaces using carboxylate, amine, phenyl, and fluorinated groups was considered. The functional group on the surface was found to significantly impact biased particle movement in the device with amine groups leading to the greatest differences. Other factors, such as flow rate, pH, and initial particle concentration, were also found to have a significant impact on particle concentrations across the feature field. View Full-Text
Keywords: chemical modification; continuous separation; geometric ratchet; nanoparticle chemical modification; continuous separation; geometric ratchet; nanoparticle
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Malanoski, A.P.; Johnson, B.J.; Erickson, J.S.; Sun, C.K.; Scoggins, C.S.; Nasir, M.; Bongard, J.E.; Moore, M.H. Nanoparticle-Surface Interactions in Geometrical Separation Devices. Chromatography 2015, 2, 567-579.

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