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Children 2017, 4(8), 70; https://doi.org/10.3390/children4080070

Health and Self-Regulation among School-Age Children Experiencing Family Homelessness

1
Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics, Division of General Pediatrics and Adolescent Health, Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
2
School of Professional Psychology, Pacific University, Hillsboro, OR 97123, USA
3
Department of Psychology, Rutgers University, Camden, NJ 08102, USA
4
Clinical and Translational Science Institute, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
5
Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota School of Public Health, Minneapolis, MN 55454, USA
6
Institute of Child Development, College of Education and Human Development, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Sari A. Acra
Received: 13 June 2017 / Revised: 28 July 2017 / Accepted: 1 August 2017 / Published: 4 August 2017
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Abstract

Children in homeless families have high levels of adversity and are at risk for behavior problems and chronic health conditions, however little is known about the relationship between cognitive-emotional self-regulation and health among school-aged homeless children. Children (n = 86; mean age 10.5) living in shelters were assessed for health, family stress/adversity, emotional-behavioral regulation, nonverbal intellectual abilities, and executive function. Vision problems were the most prevalent health condition, followed by chronic respiratory conditions. Cumulative risk, child executive function, and self-regulation problems in children were uniquely related to child physical health. Homeless children experience problems with cognitive, emotional, and behavioral regulation as well as physical health, occurring in a context of high psychosocial risk. Several aspects of children’s self-regulation predict physical health in 9- to 11-year-old homeless children. Health promotion efforts in homeless families should address individual differences in children’s self-regulation as a resilience factor. View Full-Text
Keywords: family homelessness; cognitive functioning; chronic health conditions; middle childhood; child development; resilience; psychosocial risk family homelessness; cognitive functioning; chronic health conditions; middle childhood; child development; resilience; psychosocial risk
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Barnes, A.J.; Lafavor, T.L.; Cutuli, J.J.; Zhang, L.; Oberg, C.N.; Masten, A.S. Health and Self-Regulation among School-Age Children Experiencing Family Homelessness. Children 2017, 4, 70.

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