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Evidence-Based Psychological Interventions for the Management of Pediatric Chronic Pain: New Directions in Research and Clinical Practice

by 1,2,* and 1
1
Division of Pain Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Boston Children’s Hospital, Pain Treatment Service, 333 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA
2
Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, 25 Shattuck St, Boston, MA 02115, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Lynn S. Walker
Children 2017, 4(2), 9; https://doi.org/10.3390/children4020009
Received: 22 October 2016 / Revised: 22 October 2016 / Accepted: 13 January 2017 / Published: 4 February 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chronic and Recurrent Pain)
Over the past 20 years our knowledge about evidence-based psychological interventions for pediatric chronic pain has dramatically increased. Overall, the evidence in support of psychological interventions for pediatric chronic pain is strong, demonstrating positive psychological and behavioral effects for a variety of children with a range of pain conditions. However, wide scale access to effective psychologically-based pain management treatments remains a challenge for many children who suffer with pain. Increasing access to care and reducing persistent biomedical biases that inhibit attainment of psychological services are a central focus of current pain treatment interventions. Additionally, as the number of evidence-based treatments increase, tailoring treatments to a child or family’s particular needs is increasingly possible. This article will (1) discuss the theoretical frameworks as well as the specific psychological skills and strategies that currently hold promise as effective agents of change; (2) review and summarize trends in the development of well-researched outpatient interventions over the past ten years; and (3) discuss future directions for intervention research on pediatric chronic pain. View Full-Text
Keywords: chronic pain; pediatric; psychological intervention; parent; child; evidence-based; empirically supported chronic pain; pediatric; psychological intervention; parent; child; evidence-based; empirically supported
MDPI and ACS Style

Coakley, R.; Wihak, T. Evidence-Based Psychological Interventions for the Management of Pediatric Chronic Pain: New Directions in Research and Clinical Practice. Children 2017, 4, 9.

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