Next Article in Journal
Neighborhood Safety and Major Depressive Disorder in a National Sample of Black Youth; Gender by Ethnic Differences
Next Article in Special Issue
The Role of Mindfulness in Reducing the Adverse Effects of Childhood Stress and Trauma
Previous Article in Journal / Special Issue
Medical Yoga Therapy
Open AccessArticle

Do Mothers Benefit from a Child-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Treatment (CBT) for Childhood Functional Abdominal Pain? A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial

1
Counseling Psychology, University of Potsdam, Potsdam 14469, Germany
2
Deutsche Morbus Crohn/Colitis ulcerosa Vereinigung (DCCV e.V.), Berlin 10179, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Hilary McClafferty
Children 2017, 4(2), 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/children4020013
Received: 13 December 2016 / Revised: 3 February 2017 / Accepted: 6 February 2017 / Published: 15 February 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mind-Body Medicine in Children and Adolescents)
While the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) approaches for childhood functional abdominal pain (FAP) is well-established for child outcomes, only a few studies have reported on parent-specific outcomes. This randomized controlled pilot trial analyzed effects of a group CBT on maternal variables (i.e., pain-related behavior, worries and self-efficacy, as well as general psychosocial strain). Methods: The sample constituted of 15 mothers in the intervention group (IG) and 14 mothers in the waitlist control group (WLC). Outcome measures were assessed pre-treatment, post-treatment and at three months follow-up. Results: Analyses revealed significant, large changes in maladaptive maternal reactions related to the child’s abdominal pain in the IG compared to the WLC—i.e., reduced attention (d = 0.95), medical help-seeking (d = 0.92), worries (d = 1.03), as well as a significant increase in behaviors that encourage the child’s self-management (d = 1.03). In addition, maternal self-efficacy in dealing with a child’s pain significantly increased in the IG as well (d = 0.92). Treatment effects emerged post-treatment and could be maintained until three months follow-up. There were no effects on general self-efficacy and maternal quality of life. Conclusion: While these results are promising, and underline the efficacy of the CBT approach for both the child and mothers, further studies, including long-term follow-ups, are warranted. View Full-Text
Keywords: functional abdominal pain; parents; CBT; behavior; self-efficacy; RCT; waitlist control functional abdominal pain; parents; CBT; behavior; self-efficacy; RCT; waitlist control
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Calvano, C.; Groß, M.; Warschburger, P. Do Mothers Benefit from a Child-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Treatment (CBT) for Childhood Functional Abdominal Pain? A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial. Children 2017, 4, 13. https://doi.org/10.3390/children4020013

AMA Style

Calvano C, Groß M, Warschburger P. Do Mothers Benefit from a Child-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Treatment (CBT) for Childhood Functional Abdominal Pain? A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial. Children. 2017; 4(2):13. https://doi.org/10.3390/children4020013

Chicago/Turabian Style

Calvano, Claudia; Groß, Martina; Warschburger, Petra. 2017. "Do Mothers Benefit from a Child-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Treatment (CBT) for Childhood Functional Abdominal Pain? A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial" Children 4, no. 2: 13. https://doi.org/10.3390/children4020013

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop