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Article

Growth of Defect-Induced Carbon Nanotubes for Low-Temperature Fruit Monitoring Sensor

1
Department of Physics, College of Science, King Faisal University, P.O. Box 400, Al-Ahsa 31982, Saudi Arabia
2
Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Assiut University, Assiut 71516, Egypt
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Egyptian Petroleum Research Institute, Nasr City, P.O. Box 11727, Cairo 11765, Egypt
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Department of Physics, School of Engineering, University of Petroleum & Energy Studies, Dehradun 248007, India
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Pilar López-Cornejo
Chemosensors 2021, 9(6), 131; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors9060131
Received: 9 May 2021 / Revised: 31 May 2021 / Accepted: 5 June 2021 / Published: 7 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Sensors Based on Carbon Nanotubes)
Herein, a carbon nanotubes-based sensor has been grown for the purpose of ethylene detection. The prepared CNTs had a crystalline structure with a smooth surface of 11.0 nm in diameter and 10.0 µm in length. The low-intensity graphite peak (G-band) as compared to the peak of the defect (D-band) characterizes the defects in the CNTs. An MWNTs-gas sensor was fabricated for monitoring the ethylene gas. The highest response was recorded at a low operating temperature of 30 °C. The sensor was also examined at 300 ppb up to 10 ppm and it showed a response of 2% up to 28%. The sensor response and recovery time constants were varied from 60 to 300 s, depending on the gas concentration. The results that were obtained for the synthetic ethylene gas were also compared with the real measurements for banana ripening. The results confirmed that the sensor is appropriate for the monitoring of fruit ripening. View Full-Text
Keywords: defects; electrical properties; nanostructure; plasma-enhanced CVD (PECVD) (deposition); sensor; surface reaction defects; electrical properties; nanostructure; plasma-enhanced CVD (PECVD) (deposition); sensor; surface reaction
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MDPI and ACS Style

Shaalan, N.M.; Saber, O.; Ahmed, F.; Aljaafari, A.; Kumar, S. Growth of Defect-Induced Carbon Nanotubes for Low-Temperature Fruit Monitoring Sensor. Chemosensors 2021, 9, 131. https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors9060131

AMA Style

Shaalan NM, Saber O, Ahmed F, Aljaafari A, Kumar S. Growth of Defect-Induced Carbon Nanotubes for Low-Temperature Fruit Monitoring Sensor. Chemosensors. 2021; 9(6):131. https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors9060131

Chicago/Turabian Style

Shaalan, Nagih M., Osama Saber, Faheem Ahmed, Abdullah Aljaafari, and Shalendra Kumar. 2021. "Growth of Defect-Induced Carbon Nanotubes for Low-Temperature Fruit Monitoring Sensor" Chemosensors 9, no. 6: 131. https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors9060131

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