Next Article in Journal
Alcohol Consumption Patterns during COVID-19 Lockdown and Their Relationship with Perceived Immune Fitness and Reported COVID-19 Symptoms
Next Article in Special Issue
Associations between Personality Traits, Intolerance of Uncertainty, Coping Strategies, and Stress in Italian Frontline and Non-Frontline HCWs during the COVID-19 Pandemic—A Multi-Group Path-Analysis
Previous Article in Journal
Why Nursing Home Residents Use Social Network Systems: An Attachment Perspective
Previous Article in Special Issue
Characteristics of COVID-19-Related Free Telephone Consultations by Public Health Nurses in Japan: A Retrospective Study
 
 
Article

COVID-19 Vaccine Literacy of Family Carers for Their Older Parents in Japan

Observatoire Sociologique du Changement (OSC), Sciences Po and Oxford Institute of Population Ageing, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 4BH, UK
Academic Editors: Manoj Sharma and Kavita Batra
Healthcare 2021, 9(8), 1038; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9081038
Received: 15 June 2021 / Revised: 7 August 2021 / Accepted: 9 August 2021 / Published: 12 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Collection COVID-19: Impact on Public Health and Healthcare)
In super-ageing Japan, COVID-19 vaccinations were starting to reach older people as of June 2021, which raises the issue of vaccine literacy. This study focuses on family members who work and also care for their older parents, as they are at risk of COVID-19 and also risk transmitting COVID-19 to the parents they care for and potentially influencing their parents’ vaccine uptake. Such family carers are central to the approach in Japan to achieving a sustainable and resilient society in response to ageing. Contrasting family carers’ COVID-19 vaccine literacy with their overall health literacy provides insights into their preparedness for COVID-19 vaccinations. The purpose of this study is to understand how vaccine literacy, compared to health literacy, varies across family carers and the sources of information they use. Through a cross-sectional online survey, family carers’ vaccine literacy, health literacy and their sources of information, including mass media, social media, health and care professionals, family, colleagues, friends, and others, were assessed. The participants’ (n = 292) mean age was 53, with 44% women, and an average of 8.3 h per week caring for their parents. Notwithstanding the increased risks from COVID-19 with age, COVID-19 vaccine literacy relative to health literacy for older family carers is lower on average, higher with increased provision of care, and more variable, resulting in a substantial proportion of older family carers with relatively low vaccine literacy. At this stage of vaccine rollout in Japan, family carers’ sources of information to inform COVID-19 vaccine literacy is distinct, including more national and local mass media versus less health and care professionals and informal networks, which indicates the importance of tailored health communication strategies to enhance vaccine literacy View Full-Text
Keywords: vaccine literacy; Japan; COVID-19; family carers for older adults; sustainable ageing society; health communications; mass media vaccine literacy; Japan; COVID-19; family carers for older adults; sustainable ageing society; health communications; mass media
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Costantini, H. COVID-19 Vaccine Literacy of Family Carers for Their Older Parents in Japan. Healthcare 2021, 9, 1038. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9081038

AMA Style

Costantini H. COVID-19 Vaccine Literacy of Family Carers for Their Older Parents in Japan. Healthcare. 2021; 9(8):1038. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9081038

Chicago/Turabian Style

Costantini, Hiroko. 2021. "COVID-19 Vaccine Literacy of Family Carers for Their Older Parents in Japan" Healthcare 9, no. 8: 1038. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9081038

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop