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Comment on Laratta et al. Marital Stability and Quality of Couple Relationships after Acquired Brain Injury: A Two-Year Follow-Up Clinical Study. Healthcare 2021, 9, 283
Article

Compounding Parenteral Products in Pediatric Wards—Effect of Environment and Aseptic Technique on Product Sterility

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Drug Research Program, Division of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, P.O.Box 56 (Viikinkaari 5E), University of Helsinki, FI-00014 Helsinki, Finland
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HUS Pharmacy, HUS Helsinki University Hospital and University of Helsinki, Stenbäckinkatu 9B, 00290 Helsinki, Finland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Pedram Sendi
Healthcare 2021, 9(8), 1025; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9081025
Received: 21 June 2021 / Revised: 30 July 2021 / Accepted: 3 August 2021 / Published: 10 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety)
Parenteral products must be compounded using an aseptic technique to ensure sterility of the medicine. We compared the effect of three clinical environments as compounding areas as well as different aseptic techniques on the sterility of the compounded parenteral product. Clinical pharmacists and pediatric nurses compounded 220 samples in total in three clinical environments: a patient room, a medicine room and biological safety cabinet. The study combined four methods: observation, environmental monitoring (settle plates), monitoring of personnel (finger dab plates) and sterility testing (membrane filtration). Of the compounded samples, 99% were sterile and no significant differences emerged between the clinical environments. Based on the settle plates, the biological safety cabinet was the only area that fulfilled the requirements for eliminating microbial contamination. Most of the steps on the observation form for aseptic techniques were followed. All participants disinfected their hands, wore gloves and disinfected the septum of the vial. Non-contaminated finger dab plates were mostly detected after compounding in the biological safety cabinet. Aseptic techniques were followed relatively well in all environments. However, these results emphasize the importance of good aseptic techniques and support the recommendation of compounding parenteral products in biological safety cabinets in clinical environments. View Full-Text
Keywords: parenteral products; compounding; aseptic technique; sterility test; pediatrics; patient safety parenteral products; compounding; aseptic technique; sterility test; pediatrics; patient safety
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MDPI and ACS Style

Virtanen, S.; Kapp, K.; Rautamo, M.; Schepel, L.; Lindén-Lahti, C.; Cruz, C.D.; Tammela, P. Compounding Parenteral Products in Pediatric Wards—Effect of Environment and Aseptic Technique on Product Sterility. Healthcare 2021, 9, 1025. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9081025

AMA Style

Virtanen S, Kapp K, Rautamo M, Schepel L, Lindén-Lahti C, Cruz CD, Tammela P. Compounding Parenteral Products in Pediatric Wards—Effect of Environment and Aseptic Technique on Product Sterility. Healthcare. 2021; 9(8):1025. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9081025

Chicago/Turabian Style

Virtanen, Sonja, Karmen Kapp, Maria Rautamo, Lotta Schepel, Carita Lindén-Lahti, Cristina D. Cruz, and Päivi Tammela. 2021. "Compounding Parenteral Products in Pediatric Wards—Effect of Environment and Aseptic Technique on Product Sterility" Healthcare 9, no. 8: 1025. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9081025

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