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Article

Tobacco Use and Risk Factors for Hypertensive Individuals in Kenya

1
Center for Eye Research, Department of Ophthalmology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, 0450 Oslo, Norway
2
School of Health Sciences, Kristiania University College, 0152 Oslo, Norway
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Pedram Sendi
Healthcare 2021, 9(5), 591; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9050591
Received: 6 April 2021 / Revised: 12 May 2021 / Accepted: 14 May 2021 / Published: 17 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Collection Health Economics & Finance and Global Public Health)
This study aimed to examine the association between hypertension and tobacco use as well as other known hypertensive risk factors (BMI, waist–hip ratio, alcohol consumption, physical activity, and socio-economic factors among adults) in Kenya. The study utilized the 2015 Kenya STEPs survey (adults aged 18–69) and investigated the association between tobacco use and hypertension. Descriptive statistics, correlation, frequencies, and regression (linear and logistic) analyses were used to execute the statistical analysis. The study results indicate a high prevalence of hypertension in association with certain risk factors—body mass index (BMI), alcohol, waist–hip ratio (WHR), and tobacco use—that were higher in males than females among the hypertensive group. Moreover, the findings noted an exceptionally low awareness level of hypertension in the general population. BMI, age, WHR, and alcohol use were prevalent risks of all three outcomes: hypertension, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure. Healthcare authorities and policymakers can employ these findings to lower the burden of hypertension by developing health promotion and intervention policies. View Full-Text
Keywords: tobacco use; hypertension; Kenya; non-communicable diseases; prevention; health promotion tobacco use; hypertension; Kenya; non-communicable diseases; prevention; health promotion
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MDPI and ACS Style

Walekhwa, S.N.; Kisa, A. Tobacco Use and Risk Factors for Hypertensive Individuals in Kenya. Healthcare 2021, 9, 591. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9050591

AMA Style

Walekhwa SN, Kisa A. Tobacco Use and Risk Factors for Hypertensive Individuals in Kenya. Healthcare. 2021; 9(5):591. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9050591

Chicago/Turabian Style

Walekhwa, Silvia Nanjala, and Adnan Kisa. 2021. "Tobacco Use and Risk Factors for Hypertensive Individuals in Kenya" Healthcare 9, no. 5: 591. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9050591

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