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Open AccessArticle

Eye-Tracking for Clinical Ophthalmology with Virtual Reality (VR): A Case Study of the HTC Vive Pro Eye’s Usability

1
Institute for Ophthalmic Research, University of Tübingen, 72076 Tübingen, Germany
2
Carl Zeiss Vision International GmbH, 73430 Aalen, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Tin-Chih Toly Chen
Healthcare 2021, 9(2), 180; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9020180
Received: 21 December 2020 / Revised: 4 February 2021 / Accepted: 5 February 2021 / Published: 9 February 2021
Background: A case study is proposed to empirically test and discuss the eye-tracking status-quo hardware capabilities and limitations of an off-the-shelf virtual reality (VR) headset with embedded eye-tracking for at-home ready-to-go online usability in ophthalmology applications. Methods: The eye-tracking status-quo data quality of the HTC Vive Pro Eye is investigated with novel testing specific to objective online VR perimetry. Testing was done across a wide visual field of the head-mounted-display’s (HMD) screen and in two different moving conditions. A new automatic and low-cost Raspberry Pi system is introduced for VR temporal precision testing for assessing the usability of the HTC Vive Pro Eye as an online assistance tool for visual loss. Results: The target position on the screen and head movement evidenced limitations of the eye-tracker capabilities as a perimetry assessment tool. Temporal precision testing showed the system’s latency of 58.1 milliseconds (ms), evidencing its good potential usage as a ready-to-go online assistance tool for visual loss. Conclusions: The test of the eye-tracking data quality provides novel analysis useful for testing upcoming VR headsets with embedded eye-tracking and opens discussion regarding expanding future introduction of these HMDs into patients’ homes for low-vision clinical usability. View Full-Text
Keywords: eye-tracking; head-mounted display (HMD); virtual reality (VR); ophthalmology; usability methods eye-tracking; head-mounted display (HMD); virtual reality (VR); ophthalmology; usability methods
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sipatchin, A.; Wahl, S.; Rifai, K. Eye-Tracking for Clinical Ophthalmology with Virtual Reality (VR): A Case Study of the HTC Vive Pro Eye’s Usability. Healthcare 2021, 9, 180. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9020180

AMA Style

Sipatchin A, Wahl S, Rifai K. Eye-Tracking for Clinical Ophthalmology with Virtual Reality (VR): A Case Study of the HTC Vive Pro Eye’s Usability. Healthcare. 2021; 9(2):180. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9020180

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sipatchin, Alexandra; Wahl, Siegfried; Rifai, Katharina. 2021. "Eye-Tracking for Clinical Ophthalmology with Virtual Reality (VR): A Case Study of the HTC Vive Pro Eye’s Usability" Healthcare 9, no. 2: 180. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9020180

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