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Article

Development and Validation of Prenatal Physical Activity Intervention Strategy for Women in Buffalo City Municipality, South Africa

1
Department of Nursing Science, University of Fort Hare, East London 5201, South Africa
2
Department of Public Health, University of Fort Hare, East London 5201, South Africa
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Eric Sobolewski and José Carmelo Adsuar Sala
Healthcare 2021, 9(11), 1445; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9111445
Received: 24 August 2021 / Revised: 12 October 2021 / Accepted: 23 October 2021 / Published: 26 October 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Promotion of Health and Exercise)
Women rarely participate in physical activity during pregnancy, despite scientific evidence emphasising its importance. This study sought to develop an intervention strategy to promote prenatal physical activity in Buffalo City Municipality, Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. A multi-stage approach was utilised. The Strength, Weakness, Opportunity and Threat (SWOT) approach was applied to the interfaced empirical findings on prenatal physical activity in the setting. Subsequently, the Build, Overcome, Explore and Minimise model was then used to develop strategies based on the SWOT findings. A checklist was administered to key stakeholders to validate the developed strategies. Key strategies to promote prenatal physical activity include the application of the Mom-Connect (a technological device already in use in South Africa to promote maternal health-related information for pregnant women) in collaboration with cellphone and network companies; the South African government to integrate prenatal physical activity and exercise training in the medical and health curricula to empower the healthcare providers with relevant knowledge and skills to support pregnant women in prenatal physical activity counselling; provision of increased workforce and the infrastructure necessary in antenatal sessions and antenatal physical exercise classes and counselling; the government, in partnership with various stakeholders, to provide periodical prenatal physical activity campaigns based in local, community town halls and clinics to address the lack of awareness, misrepresentations and concerns regarding the safety and benefits of physical activity during pregnancy. The effective implementation of this developed prenatal physical activity by policymakers and health professionals may help in the promotion of physical activity practices in the context of women in the setting. View Full-Text
Keywords: physical activity; strategies; pregnant women; SWOT analysis; BOEM plan; PESTEL analysis physical activity; strategies; pregnant women; SWOT analysis; BOEM plan; PESTEL analysis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Okafor, U.B.; Goon, D.T. Development and Validation of Prenatal Physical Activity Intervention Strategy for Women in Buffalo City Municipality, South Africa. Healthcare 2021, 9, 1445. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9111445

AMA Style

Okafor UB, Goon DT. Development and Validation of Prenatal Physical Activity Intervention Strategy for Women in Buffalo City Municipality, South Africa. Healthcare. 2021; 9(11):1445. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9111445

Chicago/Turabian Style

Okafor, Uchenna Benedine, and Daniel Ter Goon. 2021. "Development and Validation of Prenatal Physical Activity Intervention Strategy for Women in Buffalo City Municipality, South Africa" Healthcare 9, no. 11: 1445. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9111445

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