Next Article in Journal
The Application of Projection Word Embeddings on Medical Records Scoring System
Previous Article in Journal
Remote Management of Patients after Total Joint Arthroplasty via a Web-Based Registry during the COVID-19 Pandemic
Article

Psychological Aspects of Media Communication during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Insights from Healthcare and Pharmacy Specialists in Lithuania

1
Faculty of Public Health, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, 44307 Kaunas, Lithuania
2
Community Well-Being Center, Mykolas Romeris University, 08303 Vilnius, Lithuania
3
Department of Drug Technology and Social Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, 44307 Kaunas, Lithuania
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Ilaria Baiardini
Healthcare 2021, 9(10), 1297; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9101297
Received: 16 August 2021 / Revised: 19 September 2021 / Accepted: 27 September 2021 / Published: 29 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Topic Burden of COVID-19 in Different Countries)
In the setting of disasters, people seek information as they hope that knowledge will provide security. This makes the media a critical source of crisis exposure. The aim of the study described in this article was to analyze COVID-19 pandemic-related psychological aspects of media use by healthcare and pharmacy workers in Lithuania and to reveal the subjective effects of media consumption on their psychological well-being. 967 healthcare workers and pharmacists in Lithuania completed an electronic survey, which consisted of questions about the changes in well-being experienced since the beginning of the lockdown and media use in the search for information on COVID-19. It was found that communication might have ambiguous effects on psychological well-being. Excessive, unreliable, misleading, contradictory information and “catastrophizing” were subjectively related to impaired psychological well-being. Objective and reliable, relevant, clear, timely, hopeful and supportive information had a subjective positive effect. Seeking COVID-19-related information many times a day was associated with increased fear of becoming infected with COVID-19, feeling unable to control the risk of contracting COVID-19, fear of infecting relatives with COVID-19 and feeling that other people would avoid interaction with healthcare workers and pharmacists because of their job. General browsing was not consistently associated with COVID-19-related fears. View Full-Text
Keywords: COVID-19; pandemics; media communication; risk communication; healthcare workers; pharmacy specialists; mental health; psychological well-being COVID-19; pandemics; media communication; risk communication; healthcare workers; pharmacy specialists; mental health; psychological well-being
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Žemaitienė, N.; Kukulskienė, M.; Miglinė, V.; Kubilienė, L.; Urbonaitė, G.; Digrytė-Šertvytienė, L.; Norė, A.; Šmigelskas, K. Psychological Aspects of Media Communication during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Insights from Healthcare and Pharmacy Specialists in Lithuania. Healthcare 2021, 9, 1297. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9101297

AMA Style

Žemaitienė N, Kukulskienė M, Miglinė V, Kubilienė L, Urbonaitė G, Digrytė-Šertvytienė L, Norė A, Šmigelskas K. Psychological Aspects of Media Communication during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Insights from Healthcare and Pharmacy Specialists in Lithuania. Healthcare. 2021; 9(10):1297. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9101297

Chicago/Turabian Style

Žemaitienė, Nida, Milda Kukulskienė, Vilma Miglinė, Loreta Kubilienė, Gabrielė Urbonaitė, Laura Digrytė-Šertvytienė, Aušra Norė, and Kastytis Šmigelskas. 2021. "Psychological Aspects of Media Communication during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Insights from Healthcare and Pharmacy Specialists in Lithuania" Healthcare 9, no. 10: 1297. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9101297

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop