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Article

Subjective and Objective Mental and Physical Functions Affect Subjective Cognitive Decline in Community-Dwelling Elderly Japanese People

1
Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, Kyoto Tachibana University, Kyoto 607-8175, Japan
2
Department of Rehabilitation, Faculty of Health Sciences, Naragakuen University, Nara 631-8524, Japan
3
Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Rehabilitation, Kobe International University, Kobe 658-0032, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Healthcare 2020, 8(3), 347; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8030347
Received: 17 July 2020 / Revised: 12 September 2020 / Accepted: 17 September 2020 / Published: 18 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Collection Health Care and Services for Elderly Population)
Subjective cognitive decline (SCD) is complex and not well understood, especially among Japanese people. In the present study, we aimed to elucidate the relationships of subjective and objective mental and physical function with SCD among older community-dwelling Japanese adults. SCD was evaluated using the Kihon Checklist: Cognitive Function. Other parameters were evaluated using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the five-item version of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-5), for an objective mental function other than SCD. A timed up-and-go test (TUG) and knee extension strength were used to test objective physical function, and the Mental Component Summary (MCS) and Physical Component Summary (PCS) in the Health-Related Quality of Life survey eight-item short form (SF-8) were used for subjective mental and physical functions. The results of the MMSE, GDS-5, TUG, knee extension strength, and MCS were significantly worse in the SCD group. In addition, logistic regression analysis showed that GDS-5 and MCS were associated with SCD onset. Depressive symptoms and decreased subjective mental function contribute to SCD among community-dwelling Japanese adults. These findings will be useful for planning dementia prevention and intervention programs for older Japanese adults. View Full-Text
Keywords: community-dwelling older adults; mental function; physical function; preclinical Alzheimer’s disease; subjective cognitive decline community-dwelling older adults; mental function; physical function; preclinical Alzheimer’s disease; subjective cognitive decline
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MDPI and ACS Style

Goda, A.; Murata, S.; Nakano, H.; Shiraiwa, K.; Abiko, T.; Nonaka, K.; Iwase, H.; Anami, K.; Horie, J. Subjective and Objective Mental and Physical Functions Affect Subjective Cognitive Decline in Community-Dwelling Elderly Japanese People. Healthcare 2020, 8, 347. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8030347

AMA Style

Goda A, Murata S, Nakano H, Shiraiwa K, Abiko T, Nonaka K, Iwase H, Anami K, Horie J. Subjective and Objective Mental and Physical Functions Affect Subjective Cognitive Decline in Community-Dwelling Elderly Japanese People. Healthcare. 2020; 8(3):347. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8030347

Chicago/Turabian Style

Goda, Akio, Shin Murata, Hideki Nakano, Kayoko Shiraiwa, Teppei Abiko, Koji Nonaka, Hiroaki Iwase, Kunihiko Anami, and Jun Horie. 2020. "Subjective and Objective Mental and Physical Functions Affect Subjective Cognitive Decline in Community-Dwelling Elderly Japanese People" Healthcare 8, no. 3: 347. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8030347

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