Next Article in Journal
Does Internet Use Affect Individuals’ Medical Service Satisfaction? Evidence from China
Previous Article in Journal
The Effect of Monophasic Pulsed Current with Stretching Exercise on the Heel Pain and Plantar Fascia Thickness in Plantar Fasciitis: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Open AccessArticle

A Systematic Review of Healthcare-Associated Infectious Organisms in Medical Radiation Science Departments

1
School of Health Sciences, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan 2308, Australia
2
Centre for Resources Health and Safety, School of Health Sciences, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan 2308, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Healthcare 2020, 8(2), 80; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8020080
Received: 7 February 2020 / Revised: 19 March 2020 / Accepted: 24 March 2020 / Published: 30 March 2020
Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) pose a significant occupational risk to medical radiation science (MRS) professionals, who have a high degree of patient contact. Current research largely focusses on HAIs in patients, with limited attention given to infectious organisms that MRS professionals are exposed to. This is a significant gap that this systematic review seeks to address by summarizing current literature to determine the infectious organisms within MRS departments, their reservoirs, and transmission modes. Reporting of this systematic review follows the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses guidelines. Five databases were searched (Scopus, Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE), the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL)) for relevant studies published between 1983 and 2018. Quality assessment was performed using checklists from the Johanna Briggs Institute. Nineteen studies were included in the review; twelve of which were set in diagnostic radiography departments, two in radiotherapy departments, and five in non-MRS departments. No studies were set in nuclear medicine departments, indicating a gap in the available literature. A total of 19 genera of infectious organisms were identified in the literature, with Staphylococcus, Escherichia, Bacillus, and Corynebacterium reported in all MRS departments. Infectious organisms were identified in all observational studies, indicating a need for better infection control methods and/or compliance training within MRS to minimize the risk of infections. View Full-Text
Keywords: Healthcare-associated infection; occupational-associated infection; infectious organisms; medical radiation science; diagnostic radiography; radiation therapy; nuclear medicine Healthcare-associated infection; occupational-associated infection; infectious organisms; medical radiation science; diagnostic radiography; radiation therapy; nuclear medicine
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Picton-Barnes, D.; Pillay, M.; Lyall, D. A Systematic Review of Healthcare-Associated Infectious Organisms in Medical Radiation Science Departments. Healthcare 2020, 8, 80.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop