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Open AccessReview

Monitoring Response to Home Parenteral Nutrition in Adult Cancer Patients

1
Pain Management and Palliative Care, Department of Anesthesia, Intensive Care and Emergency, Molinette Hospital, University of Turin, 10126 Turin, Italy
2
Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, 27100 Pavia, Italy
3
Medical Oncology Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo and Department of Internal Medicine and Medical Therapy, Università degli Studi di Pavia, 27100 Pavia, Italy
4
Faculty of Medicine, University of Milan, 20122 Milan, Italy
5
Clinical Nutrition, Department of Internal Medicine, Molinette Hospital, 10126 Turin, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Healthcare 2020, 8(2), 183; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8020183
Received: 26 May 2020 / Revised: 14 June 2020 / Accepted: 21 June 2020 / Published: 23 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Artificial Nutrition in Cancer Patients)
Current guidelines recommend home parenteral nutrition (HPN) for cancer patients with chronic deficiencies of dietary intake or absorption when enteral nutrition is not adequate or feasible in suitable patients. HPN has been shown to slow down progressive weight loss and improve nutritional status, but limited information is available on the monitoring practice of cancer patients on HPN. Clinical management of these patients based only on nutritional status is incomplete. Moreover, some commonly used clinical parameters to monitor patients (weight loss, body weight, body mass index, and oral food intake) do not accurately reflect patient’s body composition, while bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) is a validated tool to properly assess nutritional status on a regular basis. Therefore, patient’s monitoring should rely on other affordable indicators such as Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) and modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (mGPS) to also assess patient’s functional status and prognosis. Finally, catheter-related complications and quality of life represent crucial issues to be monitored over time. The purpose of this narrative review is to describe the role and relevance of monitoring cancer patients on HPN, regardless of whether they are receiving anticancer treatments. These practical tips may be clinically useful to better guide healthcare providers in the nutritional care of these patients. View Full-Text
Keywords: oncology; nutritional status; nutritional support; artificial nutrition; home care; guidelines; clinical practice oncology; nutritional status; nutritional support; artificial nutrition; home care; guidelines; clinical practice
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MDPI and ACS Style

Cotogni, P.; Caccialanza, R.; Pedrazzoli, P.; Bozzetti, F.; De Francesco, A. Monitoring Response to Home Parenteral Nutrition in Adult Cancer Patients. Healthcare 2020, 8, 183. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8020183

AMA Style

Cotogni P, Caccialanza R, Pedrazzoli P, Bozzetti F, De Francesco A. Monitoring Response to Home Parenteral Nutrition in Adult Cancer Patients. Healthcare. 2020; 8(2):183. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8020183

Chicago/Turabian Style

Cotogni, Paolo; Caccialanza, Riccardo; Pedrazzoli, Paolo; Bozzetti, Federico; De Francesco, Antonella. 2020. "Monitoring Response to Home Parenteral Nutrition in Adult Cancer Patients" Healthcare 8, no. 2: 183. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8020183

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