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Article

Temporal Patterns in Performance of the 30 s Chair-Stand Test Evince Differences in Physical and Mental Characteristics among Community-Dwelling Older Adults in Japan

Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, Kyoto Tachibana University, Kyoto 607-8175, Japan
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Healthcare 2020, 8(2), 146; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8020146
Received: 30 April 2020 / Revised: 26 May 2020 / Accepted: 27 May 2020 / Published: 28 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Collection Health Care and Services for Elderly Population)
Studies involving the 30 s chair-stand test (CS-30) have shown that subjects’ movements can vary during the test, and that these variations may follow several patterns. The present study aimed to define these different patterns and their respective incidences among a population of community-dwelling older adults in Japan. We also investigated, among the patterns identified, potential associations with physical and mental characteristics. The study population comprised 202 community-dwelling older adults. Subjects were classified into four groups based on how their CS-30 performance (defined through sit–stand–sit cycle count) changed over three successive 10 s segments: “steady-goers,” “fluctuators,” “decelerators,” and “accelerators.” Several other measures were also evaluated, including sit-up count, knee-extension strength, toe-grip strength, and Mini-Mental State Examination score. We found that steady-goers and decelerators comprised 70% of the sample. Fluctuators and steady-goers showed comparable physical function. Decelerators exhibited significant correlations between CS-30 score (total cycles) and tasks involving persistence and repetitive actions (p < 0.05). In addition, accelerators showed significantly stronger knee extension than steady-goers (p < 0.01). Differences in temporal patterns of CS-30 performance corresponded to differences in certain dimensions of physical and mental function. Our findings may be useful for planning and evaluating intervention programs aimed at long-term-care prevention among community-dwelling older adults. View Full-Text
Keywords: 30 s chair-stand test; community-dwelling older adults; cognitive function; physical function 30 s chair-stand test; community-dwelling older adults; cognitive function; physical function
MDPI and ACS Style

Goda, A.; Murata, S.; Nakano, H.; Matsuda, H.; Yokoe, K.; Mitsumoto, H.; Shiraiwa, K.; Abiko, T.; Horie, J. Temporal Patterns in Performance of the 30 s Chair-Stand Test Evince Differences in Physical and Mental Characteristics among Community-Dwelling Older Adults in Japan. Healthcare 2020, 8, 146. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8020146

AMA Style

Goda A, Murata S, Nakano H, Matsuda H, Yokoe K, Mitsumoto H, Shiraiwa K, Abiko T, Horie J. Temporal Patterns in Performance of the 30 s Chair-Stand Test Evince Differences in Physical and Mental Characteristics among Community-Dwelling Older Adults in Japan. Healthcare. 2020; 8(2):146. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8020146

Chicago/Turabian Style

Goda, Akio, Shin Murata, Hideki Nakano, Hina Matsuda, Kana Yokoe, Hodaka Mitsumoto, Kayoko Shiraiwa, Teppei Abiko, and Jun Horie. 2020. "Temporal Patterns in Performance of the 30 s Chair-Stand Test Evince Differences in Physical and Mental Characteristics among Community-Dwelling Older Adults in Japan" Healthcare 8, no. 2: 146. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8020146

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