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Oral Appliances in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

by Marijke Dieltjens 1,2,3 and Olivier Vanderveken 1,3,4,*
1
Department of Translational neurosciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Antwerp, 2610 Wilrijk, Belgium
2
Special Dentistry Care, Antwerp University Hospital, 2650 Edegem, Belgium
3
ENT, Head and Neck Surgery, Antwerp University Hospital, 2650 Edegem, Belgium
4
Multidisciplinary Sleep Disorders Centre, Antwerp University Hospital, 2650 Edegem, Belgium
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Healthcare 2019, 7(4), 141; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare7040141
Received: 14 August 2019 / Revised: 29 October 2019 / Accepted: 1 November 2019 / Published: 8 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Management of Obstructive Sleep Apnoea)
Oral appliance therapy is increasingly prescribed as a non-invasive treatment option for patients diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea. The custom-made titratable mandibular advancement devices (MAD) are the recommended type of oral appliances. Mandibular advancement devices are efficacious in reducing the severity of obstructive sleep apnea, however, only to a lesser extent than standard therapy using continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Although oral appliance therapy is known to reduce the severity of obstructive sleep apnea in most of the patients, one out of three patients still show negligible improvement under MAD therapy. Therefore, the selection of the appropriate candidates for this therapy is imperative and several upfront prediction tools are described. Overall, the health outcome of mandibular advancement device therapy is similar to that of CPAP, probably due to the inferior compliance of CPAP compared to MAD therapy, resulting in similar clinical effectiveness.
Keywords: mandibular advancement therapy; treatment; sleep-disordered breathing mandibular advancement therapy; treatment; sleep-disordered breathing
MDPI and ACS Style

Dieltjens, M.; Vanderveken, O. Oral Appliances in Obstructive Sleep Apnea. Healthcare 2019, 7, 141.

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