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Open AccessArticle

Learning in Practice: Collaboration Is the Way to Improve Health System Outcomes

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School of Medicine, College of Health and Medicine, University of Tasmania, Hobart 7000, Tasmania, Australia
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School of Medicine, College of Health and Medicine, University of Tasmania, Launceston 7250, Tasmania, Australia
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School of Medicine, College of Health and Medicine, University of Tasmania, Burnie 7320, Tasmania, Australia
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Agency for Clinical Innovation, Chatswood 2067, New South Wales, Australia
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School of Pharmacy, College of Health and Medicine, University of Tasmania, Hobart 7000, Tasmania, Australia
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Healthcare 2019, 7(3), 90; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare7030090
Received: 11 June 2019 / Revised: 3 July 2019 / Accepted: 3 July 2019 / Published: 9 July 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Healthcare in 2019)
Evidence suggests that it is challenging for universities to develop workplace-relevant content and curricula by themselves, and this can lead to suboptimal educational outcomes. This paper examines the development, implementation, and evaluation of Australia’s first tertiary graduate course in healthcare redesign, a partnership initiative between industry and university. The course not only provides students with an understanding of person-centered sustainable healthcare but also the skills and confidence to design, implement, and evaluate interventions to improve health service delivery. Increasing students’ application of new knowledge has been through work-integrated learning, a pedagogy that essentially integrates theory with the practice of workplace application within a purposely designed curriculum. The specific aim of this study was to examine the outcomes of the course after two years, utilizing an anonymous online survey of graduates. Sixty-two graduates (48%) completed the survey. Kirkpatrick’s four-level evaluation model was used to analyze the data. The analysis revealed high satisfaction levels in relation to the course content and delivery. Through successful completion of the innovative course, students had increased their knowledge of health system redesign methods and, importantly, the ability to translate that knowledge into everyday practice. Graduates of the clinical redesign course reported that they had been able to transfer their skills and knowledge to others in the workplace and lead further improvement projects. View Full-Text
Keywords: project-based learning; industry partnership; healthcare; redesign; health service improvement; education; learning evaluation; blended learning project-based learning; industry partnership; healthcare; redesign; health service improvement; education; learning evaluation; blended learning
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Van Dam, P.J.; Griffin, P.; Reeves, N.S.; Prior, S.J.; Paton, B.; Verma, R.; Giles, A.; Kirkwood, L.; Peterson, G.M. Learning in Practice: Collaboration Is the Way to Improve Health System Outcomes. Healthcare 2019, 7, 90.

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