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Article

Can Music Therapy Improve the Quality of Life of Institutionalized Elderly People?

1
Department of Didactics, School Organization and Research Methods, Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, 36310 Vigo, Spain
2
Research Group on Education, Physical Activity, and Health (GIES10), Galicia Sur Research Institute (IIS Galicia Sur), SERGAS-UVIGO, 36312 Vigo, Spain
3
Department of Special Didactics, Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, 36310 Vigo, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Helen Noble and Claire Carswell
Healthcare 2022, 10(2), 310; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10020310
Received: 10 December 2021 / Revised: 24 January 2022 / Accepted: 2 February 2022 / Published: 6 February 2022
Introduction: The current population has new characteristics that require changes to be made in the public health system. In the case of the elderly, the concrete aspects of their health must be known to improve the system, in search of a better quality of life and as much independence as possible. Method: The aim of this study was to verify the efficiency of a music therapy program with institutionalized elderly participants to avoid depressive symptoms and improve social interaction and creativity. This is a group case study that uses a pretest–post-test descriptive design. The program was divided into sixteen sessions, two sessions each week. As inclusion and exclusion criteria, physical dependency and cognitive state were used. Results: The results present an improvement in the physical dimensions of quality of life and an increase in creativity and social interaction. It is recommended that the sessions in the program, aiming to achieve a greater efficiency, are extended because the elderly have very ingrained habits and routines that are very hard to eliminate. Discussion and conclusions: Music therapy, a non-pharmacological and worthwhile treatment, is a therapeutic option with proven benefits. Music therapy has the potential to improve health and quality of life in the elderly and also foster the amelioration of various chronic illnesses, such as depression. View Full-Text
Keywords: elderly; music therapy; depression; quality of life elderly; music therapy; depression; quality of life
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MDPI and ACS Style

González-Ojea, M.J.; Domínguez-Lloria, S.; Pino-Juste, M. Can Music Therapy Improve the Quality of Life of Institutionalized Elderly People? Healthcare 2022, 10, 310. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10020310

AMA Style

González-Ojea MJ, Domínguez-Lloria S, Pino-Juste M. Can Music Therapy Improve the Quality of Life of Institutionalized Elderly People? Healthcare. 2022; 10(2):310. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10020310

Chicago/Turabian Style

González-Ojea, María José, Sara Domínguez-Lloria, and Margarita Pino-Juste. 2022. "Can Music Therapy Improve the Quality of Life of Institutionalized Elderly People?" Healthcare 10, no. 2: 310. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10020310

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