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Educ. Sci. 2018, 8(4), 176; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci8040176

Religious and Heritage Education in Israel in an Era of Secularism

1
School of Education, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 529002, Israel
2
Michlalah-Jerusalem Academic College, Jerusalem 9642845, Israel
Received: 4 September 2018 / Revised: 7 October 2018 / Accepted: 12 October 2018 / Published: 19 October 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Education and Religion in a Secular Age)
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Abstract

Israel as a unique country composed of a religiously heterogeneous society of native-born Israelis whose parents arrived in the country before the declaration of Israel as an independent state in 1948 and immigrant Jews coming from countries spread throughout the world, mainly from the early 1960s until the present time, as well as Arab Moslem, Arab Christian, and Druze citizens born in the country. The Jewish population consists of secularized Jews who are almost totally estranged from the Jewish religion; traditional Jews who identify with the Jewish religion; religious modern orthodox observant Jews who share common societal goals with members of secular and religious Jewish society; and religious ultra-orthodox observant Jews who are rigid in their faith and oppose absorption and assimilation into general society. The Israeli Arab population comprises Moslems who are generally more religious than Israeli Jews, but are less religious and more flexible in their religious beliefs than Moslems living in many other countries in the Middle East. Christians who identify with their religion; and a moderately religious Druze community. Because of the heterogeneity of Israeli society, mandatory religious and heritage education presents each sector with a unique curriculum that serves the particular needs considered vital for each sector be they secular, traditional, or religious. In order to offset the differences in religious and heritage education and to enhance common social values and social cohesion in Israeli society, citizenship education, coupled with religious and heritage education, is compulsory for all population sectors. View Full-Text
Keywords: state Jewish religious education; state Jewish secular education; state Arab Moslem education; state Christian education; state Druze education; religious and heritage education; citizenship education state Jewish religious education; state Jewish secular education; state Arab Moslem education; state Christian education; state Druze education; religious and heritage education; citizenship education
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Katz, Y.J. Religious and Heritage Education in Israel in an Era of Secularism. Educ. Sci. 2018, 8, 176.

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