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Educational Leadership in Post-Colonial Contexts: What Can We Learn from the Experiences of Three Female Principals in Kenyan Secondary Schools?

by Ann E. Lopez 1,* and Peter Rugano 2,*
1
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 1V6, Canada
2
School of Education and Social Sciences, University of Embu, P.O Box 6, Embu, Kenya
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Educ. Sci. 2018, 8(3), 99; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci8030099
Received: 9 April 2018 / Revised: 31 May 2018 / Accepted: 1 July 2018 / Published: 7 July 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Societal Culture and Educational/School Leadership)
Leadership matters in the engagement and achievement of students. Much of the research in this area has emanated from western contexts and there is a growing demand for research and knowledge generated from emerging areas of the world. This qualitative study through the use of narratives, examines the experiences of three female secondary school principals in Kenyan secondary schools to gain deeper insights into leadership practices and theorizing within a post-colonial context such as Kenya. Utilizing a decolonizing education and social justice leadership discursive framework the tensions and complexities of their leadership practices are explored. Educational leaders in developing countries face problems that are uniquely different from their counterparts in Western countries and as such leadership practices and theorizing must be contextualized. Findings of the study support existing research on the perpetuation of colonized approaches to education, existence of a “managing” view of leadership, tensions in practice regarding the manifestation of social issues in schools, and the need for leadership development grounded in Kenyan knowledge and experiences. While these findings can inform leadership discourses and practices, further research is warranted on a larger scale with greater diversity of participants. View Full-Text
Keywords: Africa; decolonizing education; diversity; Kenya; school leadership; social justice leadership Africa; decolonizing education; diversity; Kenya; school leadership; social justice leadership
MDPI and ACS Style

Lopez, A.E.; Rugano, P. Educational Leadership in Post-Colonial Contexts: What Can We Learn from the Experiences of Three Female Principals in Kenyan Secondary Schools? Educ. Sci. 2018, 8, 99.

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