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Article

Confident Parents for Easier Children: A Parental Self-Efficacy Program to Improve Young Children’s Behavior

1
Psychological Sciences Research Institute, University of Louvain, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium
2
Faculté de Psychologie, Logopédie et Sciences de L’éducation, Université de Liège, 4000 Liege, Belgium
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Educ. Sci. 2018, 8(3), 134; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci8030134
Received: 20 June 2018 / Revised: 13 August 2018 / Accepted: 28 August 2018 / Published: 31 August 2018
This study presents the effects on children’s behavior of Confident Parents, a focused parenting program targeting parental self-efficacy. This parenting program aims to improve child behavior through the enhancement of parental self-efficacy. Confident Parents was experimentally tested on a total sample of 80 parents of three-to-six-year-old preschool aged children with moderate to clinical levels of externalizing behavior. Thirty-seven parents participated in the program, and were compared with a waitlist control group (n = 43). The intervention consisted of eight weekly group sessions. Effect sizes were evaluated through both observational and parent-report measures on the child’s behavior, as well as self-reported parental self-efficacy at pretest, post-test, and a four-month follow-up. Through a multi-level analysis, predictors of the change in the child’s behavior were identified. The moderating effect of socio-economic risk and externalizing behavior at baseline were also included in the analysis. Results show that Confident Parents improved the child’s behavior, both reported by parents and, to a lesser extent, when observed in interaction with the parent. Children with higher levels of behavior difficulty benefited more while those with socio-economic risk benefited less from this program. These results illustrate that focusing a parenting program on improving self-efficacy is effective to reduce externalizing behavior in children. This underdeveloped treatment target is worthy of investigation in parenting intervention research. View Full-Text
Keywords: parenting; preschoolers; intervention; self-efficacy; child externalizing behavior parenting; preschoolers; intervention; self-efficacy; child externalizing behavior
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mouton, B.; Loop, L.; Stiévenart, M.; Roskam, I. Confident Parents for Easier Children: A Parental Self-Efficacy Program to Improve Young Children’s Behavior. Educ. Sci. 2018, 8, 134. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci8030134

AMA Style

Mouton B, Loop L, Stiévenart M, Roskam I. Confident Parents for Easier Children: A Parental Self-Efficacy Program to Improve Young Children’s Behavior. Education Sciences. 2018; 8(3):134. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci8030134

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mouton, Bénédicte, Laurie Loop, Marie Stiévenart, and Isabelle Roskam. 2018. "Confident Parents for Easier Children: A Parental Self-Efficacy Program to Improve Young Children’s Behavior" Education Sciences 8, no. 3: 134. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci8030134

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