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‘Speaking Truth’ Protects Underrepresented Minorities’ Intellectual Performance and Safety in STEM

1
Department of Psychology, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA 94132
2
Department of Psychology, The Graduate Center, City University of New York, New York, NY 10017
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Department of Biology, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA 94132
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Center for Vulnerable Populations, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143
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Department of Social & Behavioral Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Educ. Sci. 2017, 7(2), 65; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci7020065
Received: 14 April 2017 / Revised: 16 June 2017 / Accepted: 16 June 2017 / Published: 19 June 2017
We offer and test a brief psychosocial intervention, Speaking Truth to EmPower (STEP), designed to protect underrepresented minorities’ (URMs) intellectual performance and safety in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). STEP takes a ‘knowledge as power’ approach by: (a) providing a tutorial on stereotype threat (i.e., a social contextual phenomenon, implicated in underperformance and early exit) and (b) encouraging URMs to use lived experiences for generating be-prepared coping strategies. Participants were 670 STEM undergraduates [URMs (Black/African American and Latina/o) and non-URMs (White/European American and Asian/Asian American)]. STEP protected URMs’ abstract reasoning and class grades (adjusted for grade point average [GPA]) as well as decreased URMs’ worries about confirming ethnic/racial stereotypes. STEP’s two-pronged approach—explicating the effects of structural ‘isms’ while harnessing URMs’ existing assets—shows promise in increasing diversification and equity in STEM. View Full-Text
Keywords: stereotype threat; STEM; race; ethnicity; affirmation stereotype threat; STEM; race; ethnicity; affirmation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ben-Zeev, A.; Paluy, Y.; Milless, K.; Goldstein, E.; Wallace, L.; Marquez-Magana, L.; Bibbins-Domingo, K.; Estrada, M. ‘Speaking Truth’ Protects Underrepresented Minorities’ Intellectual Performance and Safety in STEM. Educ. Sci. 2017, 7, 65. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci7020065

AMA Style

Ben-Zeev A, Paluy Y, Milless K, Goldstein E, Wallace L, Marquez-Magana L, Bibbins-Domingo K, Estrada M. ‘Speaking Truth’ Protects Underrepresented Minorities’ Intellectual Performance and Safety in STEM. Education Sciences. 2017; 7(2):65. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci7020065

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ben-Zeev, Avi; Paluy, Yula; Milless, Katlyn; Goldstein, Emily; Wallace, Lyndsey; Marquez-Magana, Leticia; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Estrada, Mica. 2017. "‘Speaking Truth’ Protects Underrepresented Minorities’ Intellectual Performance and Safety in STEM" Educ. Sci. 7, no. 2: 65. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci7020065

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