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Open AccessArticle

“Being in Control of My Asthma Myself” Patient Experience of Asthma Management: A Qualitative Interpretive Description

1
Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 1C9, Canada
2
Asthma Working Group of the Respiratory Health Strategic Clinical Network, Alberta Health Services, Calgary, AB T2W 1S7, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Pharmacy 2018, 6(4), 121; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy6040121
Received: 29 September 2018 / Revised: 9 November 2018 / Accepted: 12 November 2018 / Published: 15 November 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Communication in Pharmacy Practice)
Asthma control can be achieved with effective and safe medication use; however, many patients are not controlled. Patients’ perceptions of asthma, asthma treatment, and pharmacist roles can impact patient outcomes. The purpose of this study was to explore patients’ experiences and patient–pharmacist relationships in asthma care. Qualitative Interpretive Description method guided the study. Semi-structured individual interviews were conducted with 11 patients recruited from personal contacts, pharmacies, and asthma clinics. Categories and themes were identified using inductive constant comparison. Themes indicated patients had a personalized common sense approach to asthma management, “go-to” health care provider, and prioritized patient–pharmacist relationships. Patients described their illness experiences and asthma control based on personal markers similar to the common sense model of self-regulation. Patients chose a family physician, asthma specialist, respiratory therapist, or pharmacist as an expert resource for asthma management. Patient perceived pharmacists’ roles as information provider, adviser, or care provider. Pharmacists who develop a collaborative relationship with their asthma patients are better positioned to provide tailored education and self-management support. Inviting patients to share their perspective could increase patient engagement and uptake of personalised asthma action plans to achieve asthma control. View Full-Text
Keywords: asthma; patient experience; patient-centred care; communication; patient education; patient-pharmacist relationship; self-regulation; qualitative interpretive description asthma; patient experience; patient-centred care; communication; patient education; patient-pharmacist relationship; self-regulation; qualitative interpretive description
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Olufemi-Yusuf, D.T.; Gabriel, S.B.; Makhinova, T.; Guirguis, L.M. “Being in Control of My Asthma Myself” Patient Experience of Asthma Management: A Qualitative Interpretive Description. Pharmacy 2018, 6, 121.

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