Next Article in Journal
Language and Math: What If We Have Two Separate Naming Systems?
Next Article in Special Issue
The Late(r) Bird Gets the Verb? Effects of Age of Acquisition of English on Adult Heritage Speakers’ Knowledge of Subjunctive Mood in Spanish
Previous Article in Journal
Educating Refugee-Background Students: Critical Issues and Dynamic Contexts. Edited by Shawna Shapiro, Raichle Farrelly and Mary Jane Curry, Bristol: Multilingual Matters, 2018, 264p. ISBN: 978-1-78309-996-2
Previous Article in Special Issue
Measuring Language Dominance in Early Spanish/English Bilinguals
Open AccessArticle

Control Stimuli in Experimental Code-Switching Research

Department of Modern Languages and Classics, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0246, USA
Languages 2019, 4(3), 67; https://doi.org/10.3390/languages4030067
Received: 1 June 2019 / Revised: 10 August 2019 / Accepted: 14 August 2019 / Published: 29 August 2019
The current study investigates whether there is variation among different types of control stimuli in code-switching (CS) research, how such stimuli can be used to accommodate heterogeneity, and how they can also be used as a baseline comparison of acceptability. A group of native Spanish–English bilinguals (n = 20) completed a written acceptability judgment task with a 7-point Likert scale. Five different types of control stimuli were included, with three types considered to be completely acceptable (complex-sentence switches, direct-object switches, and subject–predicate switches) and two types considered to be completely unacceptable (pronoun switches and present–perfect switches). Additionally, a set of present–progressive switches were included as a comparison, as their acceptability status is still actively debated. The participants as a whole exhibited the expected grammatical distinctions among the control stimuli, but with a high degree of individual variability. Pronoun switches and auxiliary verb switches were rated significantly lower than the complex-sentence switches, direct-object switches, and subject–predicate switches. These results show that control stimuli can also establish a baseline comparison of acceptability, and recommendations for inclusion in experimental CS research are provided. View Full-Text
Keywords: code-switching; bilingualism; syntax; methodology; Spanish; English code-switching; bilingualism; syntax; methodology; Spanish; English
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Koronkiewicz, B. Control Stimuli in Experimental Code-Switching Research. Languages 2019, 4, 67.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop