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Aerospace 2018, 5(4), 118; https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace5040118

Crack Growth in a Range of Additively Manufactured Aerospace Structural Materials

1
Computational Multiphysics Systems Laboratory, Code 6394, Center for Materials Physics and Technology, US Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375, USA
2
Centre of Expertise for Structural Mechanics, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800, Australia
3
Structures Division, Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, MD 20670, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 26 September 2018 / Revised: 25 October 2018 / Accepted: 2 November 2018 / Published: 9 November 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Civil and Military Airworthiness: Recent Developments and Challenges)
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Abstract

The aerospace industry is now beginning to adopt Additive Manufacturing (AM), both for new aircraft design and to help improve aircraft availability (aircraft sustainment). However, MIL-STD 1530 highlights that to certify airworthiness, the operational life of the airframe must be determined by a damage tolerance analysis. MIL-STD 1530 also states that in this process, the role of testing is merely to validate or correct the analysis. Consequently, if AM-produced parts are to be used as load-carrying members, it is important that the d a / d N versus ΔK curves be determined and, if possible, a valid mathematical representation determined. The present paper demonstrates that for AM Ti-6Al-4V, AM 316L stainless steel, and AM AerMet 100 steel, the d a / d N versus ΔK curves can be represented reasonably well by the Hartman-Schijve variant of the NASGRO crack growth equation. It is also shown that the variability in the various AM d a / d N versus Δ K curves is captured reasonably well by using the curve determined for conventionally manufactured materials and allowing for changes in the threshold and the cyclic fracture toughness terms. View Full-Text
Keywords: additive manufacturing; Ti-6Al-4V; 316L stainless steel; AerMet100 steel; crack growth; NASGRO additive manufacturing; Ti-6Al-4V; 316L stainless steel; AerMet100 steel; crack growth; NASGRO
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Iliopoulos, A.; Jones, R.; Michopoulos, J.; Phan, N.; Singh Raman, R.K. Crack Growth in a Range of Additively Manufactured Aerospace Structural Materials. Aerospace 2018, 5, 118.

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