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Article

Crack Growth in a Range of Additively Manufactured Aerospace Structural Materials

1
Computational Multiphysics Systems Laboratory, Code 6394, Center for Materials Physics and Technology, US Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375, USA
2
Centre of Expertise for Structural Mechanics, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800, Australia
3
Structures Division, Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, MD 20670, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Aerospace 2018, 5(4), 118; https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace5040118
Received: 26 September 2018 / Revised: 25 October 2018 / Accepted: 2 November 2018 / Published: 9 November 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Civil and Military Airworthiness: Recent Developments and Challenges)
The aerospace industry is now beginning to adopt Additive Manufacturing (AM), both for new aircraft design and to help improve aircraft availability (aircraft sustainment). However, MIL-STD 1530 highlights that to certify airworthiness, the operational life of the airframe must be determined by a damage tolerance analysis. MIL-STD 1530 also states that in this process, the role of testing is merely to validate or correct the analysis. Consequently, if AM-produced parts are to be used as load-carrying members, it is important that the d a / d N versus ΔK curves be determined and, if possible, a valid mathematical representation determined. The present paper demonstrates that for AM Ti-6Al-4V, AM 316L stainless steel, and AM AerMet 100 steel, the d a / d N versus ΔK curves can be represented reasonably well by the Hartman-Schijve variant of the NASGRO crack growth equation. It is also shown that the variability in the various AM d a / d N versus Δ K curves is captured reasonably well by using the curve determined for conventionally manufactured materials and allowing for changes in the threshold and the cyclic fracture toughness terms. View Full-Text
Keywords: additive manufacturing; Ti-6Al-4V; 316L stainless steel; AerMet100 steel; crack growth; NASGRO additive manufacturing; Ti-6Al-4V; 316L stainless steel; AerMet100 steel; crack growth; NASGRO
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MDPI and ACS Style

Iliopoulos, A.; Jones, R.; Michopoulos, J.; Phan, N.; Singh Raman, R.K. Crack Growth in a Range of Additively Manufactured Aerospace Structural Materials. Aerospace 2018, 5, 118. https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace5040118

AMA Style

Iliopoulos A, Jones R, Michopoulos J, Phan N, Singh Raman RK. Crack Growth in a Range of Additively Manufactured Aerospace Structural Materials. Aerospace. 2018; 5(4):118. https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace5040118

Chicago/Turabian Style

Iliopoulos, Athanasios; Jones, Rhys; Michopoulos, John; Phan, Nam; Singh Raman, R. K. 2018. "Crack Growth in a Range of Additively Manufactured Aerospace Structural Materials" Aerospace 5, no. 4: 118. https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace5040118

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