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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

Are Energy Security Concerns Dominating Environmental Concerns? Evidence from Stakeholder Participation Processes on Energy Transition in Jordan

1
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), Schlossplatz 1, A-2361 Laxenburg, Austria
2
Climate Policy Group, Institute for Environmental Decisions (ETH), 8092 Zurich, Switzerland
3
Department of Computer and Systems Sciences, Stockholm University, 10691 Kista, Sweden
4
Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Jordan, 11942 Amman, Jordan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Climate 2018, 6(4), 88; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli6040088
Received: 30 September 2018 / Revised: 30 October 2018 / Accepted: 31 October 2018 / Published: 1 November 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change, Carbon Budget and Energy Policy)
To satisfy Jordan’s growing demand for electricity and to diversify its energy mix, the Jordanian government is considering a number of electricity-generation technologies that would allow for locally available resources to be used alongside imported energy. Energy policy in Jordan aims to address both climate change mitigation and energy security by increasing the share of low-carbon technologies and domestically available resources in the Jordanian electricity mix. Existing technological alternatives include the scaling up of renewable energy sources, such as solar and wind; the deployment of nuclear energy; and shale oil exploration. However, the views, perceptions, and opinions regarding these technologies—their benefits, risks, and costs—vary significantly among different social groups both inside and outside the country. Considering the large-scale policy intervention that would be needed to deploy these technologies, a compromise solution must be reached. This paper is based on the results of a four-year research project that included extensive stakeholder processes in Jordan, involving several social groups and the application of various methods of participatory governance research, such as multi-criteria decision-making. The results show the variety of opinions expressed and provide insights into each type of electricity-generation technology and its relevance for each stakeholder group. There is a strong prevalence of economic rationality in the results, given that electricity-system costs are prioritized by almost all stakeholder groups. View Full-Text
Keywords: energy policy in Jordan; participatory governance; conflicting views of different stakeholders groups; perceptions of risks; benefits and costs of electricity-generation technologies; compromise solutions energy policy in Jordan; participatory governance; conflicting views of different stakeholders groups; perceptions of risks; benefits and costs of electricity-generation technologies; compromise solutions
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Komendantova, N.; Ekenberg, L.; Marashdeh, L.; Al Salaymeh, A.; Danielson, M.; Linnerooth-Bayer, J. Are Energy Security Concerns Dominating Environmental Concerns? Evidence from Stakeholder Participation Processes on Energy Transition in Jordan. Climate 2018, 6, 88.

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