Next Article in Journal
Allelic Variants of CRISPR/Cas9 Induced Mutation in an Inositol Trisphosphate 5/6 Kinase Gene Manifest Different Phenotypes in Barley
Next Article in Special Issue
Flavones Produced by Mulberry Flavone Synthase Type I Constitute a Defense Line against the Ultraviolet-B Stress
Previous Article in Journal
Tomato Phenotypic Diversity Determined by Combined Approaches of Conventional and High-Throughput Tomato Analyzer Phenotyping
Previous Article in Special Issue
Physiological, Biochemical and Reproductive Studies on Valeriana wallichii, a Critically Endangered Medicinal Plant of the Himalayan Region Grown under In-Situ and Ex-Situ Conditions
Open AccessArticle

Physiological Response of Miscanthus x giganteus to Plant Growth Regulators in Nutritionally Poor Soil

1
Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Jan Evangelista Purkyně University in Ústí nad Labem, 400 96 Ústí nad Labem, Czech Republic
2
Department of Environmental Chemistry and Technology, Faculty of Environment, Jan Evangelista Purkyně University in Ústí nad Labem, 400 96 Ústí nad Labem, Czech Republic
3
Clinical Research Centre, Medical University of Białystok, 15-089 Białystok, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Plants 2020, 9(2), 194; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9020194
Received: 20 December 2019 / Revised: 3 February 2020 / Accepted: 4 February 2020 / Published: 5 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Impacts of Abiotic Stresses on Plant Development)
Miscanthus x giganteus (Mxg) is a promising second-generation biofuel crop with high production of energetic biomass. Our aim was to determine the level of plant stress of Mxg grown in poor quality soils using non-invasive physiological parameters and to test whether the stress could be reduced by application of plant growth regulators (PGRs). Plant fitness was quantified by measuring of leaf fluorescence using 24 indexes to select the most suitable fluorescence indicators for quantification of this type of abiotic stress. Simultaneously, visible stress signs were observed on stems and leaves and differences in variants were revealed also by microscopy of leaf sections. Leaf fluorescence analysis, visual observation and changes of leaf anatomy revealed significant stress in all studied subjects compared to those cultivated in good quality soil. Besides commonly used Fv/Fm (potential photosynthetic efficiency) and P.I. (performance index), which showed very low sensitivity, we suggest other fluorescence parameters (like dissipation, DIo/RC) for revealing finer differences. We can conclude that measurement of leaf fluorescence is a suitable method for revealing stress affecting Mxg in poor soils. However, none of investigated parameters proved significant positive effect of PGRs on stress reduction. Therefore, direct improvement of soil quality by fertilization should be considered for stress reduction and improving the biomass quality in this type of soils. View Full-Text
Keywords: Miscanthus x giganteus; leaf fluorescence; nutritionally poor post-military soil; plant physiology; plant stress Miscanthus x giganteus; leaf fluorescence; nutritionally poor post-military soil; plant physiology; plant stress
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Malinská, H.; Pidlisnyuk, V.; Nebeská, D.; Erol, A.; Medžová, A.; Trögl, J. Physiological Response of Miscanthus x giganteus to Plant Growth Regulators in Nutritionally Poor Soil. Plants 2020, 9, 194.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop