Next Article in Journal
The Investigation of Silicon Localization and Accumulation in Citrus
Next Article in Special Issue
Clothing the Emperor: Dynamic Root–Shoot Allocation Trajectories in Relation to Whole-Plant Growth Rate and in Response to Temperature
Previous Article in Journal
Nitrogen Dioxide at Ambient Concentrations Induces Nitration and Degradation of PYR/PYL/RCAR Receptors to Stimulate Plant Growth: A Hypothetical Model
Open AccessArticle

Intraspecific Fine-Root Trait-Environment Relationships across Interior Douglas-Fir Forests of Western Canada

1
Department of Forest and Conservation Sciences, Faculty of Forestry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada
2
Center for Tree Science, The Morton Arboretum, Lisle, IL 60532, USA
3
Skyline Forestry Consultants Ltd., Kamloops, BC V2C 1A2, Canada
4
CSIR-Forestry Research Institute of Ghana, KNUST, P. O. Box 63, Kumasi, Ghana
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Plants 2019, 8(7), 199; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants8070199
Received: 3 June 2019 / Revised: 25 June 2019 / Accepted: 28 June 2019 / Published: 30 June 2019
Variation in resource acquisition strategies enables plants to adapt to different environments and may partly determine their responses to climate change. However, little is known about how belowground plant traits vary across climate and soil gradients. Focusing on interior Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca) in western Canada, we tested whether fine-root traits relate to the environment at the intraspecific level. We quantified the variation in commonly measured functional root traits (morphological, chemical, and architectural traits) among the first three fine-root orders (i.e., absorptive fine roots) and across biogeographic gradients in climate and soil factors. Moderate but consistent trait-environment linkages occurred across populations of Douglas-fir, despite high levels of within-site variation. Shifts in morphological traits across regions were decoupled from those in chemical traits. Fine roots in colder/drier climates were characterized by a lower tissue density, higher specific area, larger diameter, and lower carbon-to-nitrogen ratio than those in warmer/wetter climates. Our results showed that Douglas-fir fine roots do not rely on adjustments in architectural traits to adapt rooting strategies in different environments. Intraspecific fine-root adjustments at the regional scale do not fit along a single axis of root economic strategy and are concordant with an increase in root acquisitive potential in colder/drier environments. View Full-Text
Keywords: belowground; biogeographic gradient; Douglas-fir; fine root; mycorrhizal fungi; plant traits; root diameter; root economics; root tissue density belowground; biogeographic gradient; Douglas-fir; fine root; mycorrhizal fungi; plant traits; root diameter; root economics; root tissue density
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Defrenne, C.E.; McCormack, M.L.; Roach, W.J.; Addo-Danso, S.D.; Simard, S.W. Intraspecific Fine-Root Trait-Environment Relationships across Interior Douglas-Fir Forests of Western Canada. Plants 2019, 8, 199.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop