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Plants 2018, 7(4), 83; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants7040083

Should I Eat or Should I Go? Acridid Grasshoppers and Their Novel Host Plants: Potential for Biotic Resistance

Department of Entomology, University of Maryland, 4291 Fieldhouse Drive, 3128 Plant Sciences, College Park, MD 20742, USA
Received: 22 July 2018 / Revised: 27 September 2018 / Accepted: 2 October 2018 / Published: 7 October 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plants Interacting with other Organisms: Insects)
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Abstract

Novel, non-coevolved associations between introduced plants and native insect herbivores may lead to changes in trophic interactions in native communities, as well as to substantial economic problems. Although some studies in invasion ecology demonstrated that native herbivores can preferentially feed on introduced plants and therefore contribute to the biotic resistance of native communities to plant invasions, the role of acridid grasshoppers as native generalist insect herbivores is largely overlooked. This systematic review aimed to identify patterns of grasshopper feeding preferences for native versus introduced plants and, consequently, a potential of grasshoppers to provide biotic resistance of native communities. The analysis of 63 records of feeding preference trials for 28 North-American grasshopper species (retrieved from 2146 studies published during 1967–2017) has demonstrated a preference of grasshoppers for introduced host plants, and identified 12 preferred introduced plants with high or middle invasive ranks. A significant effect of the life stage (p < 0.001), but not the experimental environment, plant material, and measurements, on grasshopper preferences for introduced plants was also detected. Overall, results suggest a potential of acridid grasshoppers to contribute to the biotic resistance of native communities. The review also provides methodological recommendations for future experimental studies on grasshopper-host plant interactions. View Full-Text
Keywords: Acrididae; herbivory; introduced plants; invasive species; novel associations; plant-insect interactions Acrididae; herbivory; introduced plants; invasive species; novel associations; plant-insect interactions
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).

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Avanesyan, A. Should I Eat or Should I Go? Acridid Grasshoppers and Their Novel Host Plants: Potential for Biotic Resistance. Plants 2018, 7, 83.

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