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Review

Plant Secondary Metabolites against Skin Photodamage: Mexican Plants, a Potential Source of UV-Radiation Protectant Molecules

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Laboratory of Cell Metabolism, Faculty of Chemistry, Autonomous University of Nuevo León, Pedro de Alba s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, San Nicolás de los Garza 66451, Mexico
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Centro de Biotecnología FEMSA, Instituto Tecnológico de Monterrey, Avenida Junco de la Vega, Col. Tecnológico, Montrerrey 65849, Mexico
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Laboratorio de Farmacología Molecular y Modelos Biológicos, División de Estudios de Posgrado, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Av. Guerrero s/n, Col. Treviño, Monterrey 64570, Mexico
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Adam Stebel
Plants 2022, 11(2), 220; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants11020220
Received: 29 November 2021 / Revised: 7 January 2022 / Accepted: 12 January 2022 / Published: 15 January 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Resources of Medicinal and Cosmetic Plants)
Human skin works as a barrier against the adverse effects of environmental agents, including ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Exposure to UVR is associated with a variety of harmful effects on the skin, and it is one of the most common health concerns. Solar UVR constitutes the major etiological factor in the development of cutaneous malignancy. However, more than 90% of skin cancer cases could be avoided with appropriate preventive measures such as regular sunscreen use. Plants, constantly irradiated by sunlight, are able to synthesize specialized molecules to fight against UVR damage. Phenolic compounds, alkaloids and carotenoids constitute the major plant secondary metabolism compounds with relevant UVR protection activities. Hence, plants are an important source of molecules used to avoid UVR damage, reduce photoaging and prevent skin cancers and related illnesses. Due to its significance, we reviewed the main plant secondary metabolites related to UVR protection and its reported mechanisms. In addition, we summarized the research in Mexican plants related to UV protection. We presented the most studied Mexican plants and the photoprotective molecules found in them. Additionally, we analyzed the studies conducted to elucidate the mechanism of photoprotection of those molecules and their potential use as ingredients in sunscreen formulas. View Full-Text
Keywords: UV protection; plant secondary metabolites; UVR-damage; antioxidant activity; Mexican plants UV protection; plant secondary metabolites; UVR-damage; antioxidant activity; Mexican plants
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MDPI and ACS Style

Torres-Contreras, A.M.; Garcia-Baeza, A.; Vidal-Limon, H.R.; Balderas-Renteria, I.; Ramírez-Cabrera, M.A.; Ramirez-Estrada, K. Plant Secondary Metabolites against Skin Photodamage: Mexican Plants, a Potential Source of UV-Radiation Protectant Molecules. Plants 2022, 11, 220. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants11020220

AMA Style

Torres-Contreras AM, Garcia-Baeza A, Vidal-Limon HR, Balderas-Renteria I, Ramírez-Cabrera MA, Ramirez-Estrada K. Plant Secondary Metabolites against Skin Photodamage: Mexican Plants, a Potential Source of UV-Radiation Protectant Molecules. Plants. 2022; 11(2):220. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants11020220

Chicago/Turabian Style

Torres-Contreras, Ana M., Antoni Garcia-Baeza, Heriberto R. Vidal-Limon, Isaias Balderas-Renteria, Mónica A. Ramírez-Cabrera, and Karla Ramirez-Estrada. 2022. "Plant Secondary Metabolites against Skin Photodamage: Mexican Plants, a Potential Source of UV-Radiation Protectant Molecules" Plants 11, no. 2: 220. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants11020220

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