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Review

Allelopathy of Lantana camara as an Invasive Plant

1
Department of Applied Biological Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Kagawa University, Miki 761-0795, Kagawa, Japan
2
Department of Agronomy, Faculty of Agriculture, Universitas Padjadjaran Jl. Raya, Bandung Sumedang KM 21 Sumedang, Jawa Barat 45363, Indonesia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Bousquet-Mélou Anne, James M. Mwendwa and Sajid Latif
Plants 2021, 10(5), 1028; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10051028
Received: 27 April 2021 / Revised: 17 May 2021 / Accepted: 17 May 2021 / Published: 20 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant–Plant Allelopathic Interactions)
Lantana camara L. (Verbenaceae) is native to tropical America and has been introduced into many other countries as an ornamental and hedge plant. The species has been spreading quickly and has naturalized in more than 60 countries as an invasive noxious weed. It is considered to be one of the world’s 100 worst alien species. L. camara often forms dense monospecies stands through the interruption of the regeneration process of indigenous plant species. Allelopathy of L. camara has been reported to play a crucial role in its invasiveness. The extracts, essential oil, leachates, residues, and rhizosphere soil of L. camara suppressed the germination and growth of other plant species. Several allelochemicals, such as phenolic compounds, sesquiterpenes, triterpenes, and a flavonoid, were identified in the extracts, essential oil, residues, and rhizosphere soil of L. camara. The evidence also suggests that some of those allelochemicals in L. camara are probably released into the rhizosphere soil under the canopy and neighboring environments during the decomposition process of the residues and as leachates and volatile compounds from living plant parts of L. camara. The released allelochemicals may suppress the regeneration process of indigenous plant species by decreasing their germination and seedling growth and increasing their mortality. Therefore, the allelopathic property of L. camara may support its invasive potential and formation of dense monospecies stands. View Full-Text
Keywords: allelochemical; decomposition; indigenous plant; monospecies stand; phytotoxicity; worst alien species allelochemical; decomposition; indigenous plant; monospecies stand; phytotoxicity; worst alien species
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kato-Noguchi, H.; Kurniadie, D. Allelopathy of Lantana camara as an Invasive Plant. Plants 2021, 10, 1028. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10051028

AMA Style

Kato-Noguchi H, Kurniadie D. Allelopathy of Lantana camara as an Invasive Plant. Plants. 2021; 10(5):1028. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10051028

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kato-Noguchi, Hisashi, and Denny Kurniadie. 2021. "Allelopathy of Lantana camara as an Invasive Plant" Plants 10, no. 5: 1028. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10051028

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