Next Article in Journal
Pharmacological Investigations in Traditional Utilization of Alhagi maurorum Medik. in Saharan Algeria: In Vitro Study of Anti-Inflammatory and Antihyperglycemic Activities of Water-Soluble Polysaccharides Extracted from the Seeds
Previous Article in Journal
A Historical Perspective of Bladderworts (Utricularia): Traps, Carnivory and Body Architecture
Previous Article in Special Issue
Assessing the Weed-Suppressing Potential of Cotton Chromosome Substitution Lines Using the Stair-Step Assay
Article

Solar Radiation Flux Provides a Method of Quantifying Weed-Crop Balance in Present and Future Climates

James Hutton Institute, Dundee DD2 5DA, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Ali Bajwa, Amar Matloob and Muthukumar Bagavathiannan
Plants 2021, 10(12), 2657; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10122657
Received: 31 October 2021 / Revised: 26 November 2021 / Accepted: 30 November 2021 / Published: 3 December 2021
A systematic approach to quantifying the weed–crop balance through the flux of solar radiation was developed and tested on commercial fields in a long-established Atlantic zone cropland. Measuring and modelling solar energy flux in crop stands has become standard practice in analysis and comparison of crop growth and yield across regions, species and years. In a similar manner, the partitioning of incoming radiation between crops and the in-field plant community may provide ‘common currencies’ through which to quantify positive and negative effects of weeds in relation to global change. Here, possibilities were explored for converting simple ground-cover measures in commercial fields of winter and spring oilseed rape in eastern Scotland, UK to metrics of solar flux. Solar radiation intercepted by the crops ranged with season and sowing delay from 129 to 1975 MJ m−2 (15-fold). Radiation transmitted through the crop, together with local weed management, resulted in a 70-fold range of weed intercepted radiation (14.2 to 963 MJ m−2), which in turn explained 93% of the corresponding between-site variation in weed dry mass (6.36 to 459 g m−2). Transmitted radiation explained almost 90% of the variation in number of weed species per field (12 to 40). The conversion of intercepted radiation to weed dry matter was far less variable at a mean of 0.74 g MJ−1 at both winter and spring sites. The primary cause of variation was an interaction between the temperature at sowing and the annual wave of incoming solar radiation. The high degree of explanatory power in solar flux indicates its potential use as an initial predictor and subsequent monitoring tool in the face of future change in climate and cropping intensity. View Full-Text
Keywords: weeds; crop growth; solar flux; radiation; plant diversity; climate; adaptation weeds; crop growth; solar flux; radiation; plant diversity; climate; adaptation
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Squire, G.R.; Young, M.W.; Hawes, C. Solar Radiation Flux Provides a Method of Quantifying Weed-Crop Balance in Present and Future Climates. Plants 2021, 10, 2657. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10122657

AMA Style

Squire GR, Young MW, Hawes C. Solar Radiation Flux Provides a Method of Quantifying Weed-Crop Balance in Present and Future Climates. Plants. 2021; 10(12):2657. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10122657

Chicago/Turabian Style

Squire, Geoffrey R., Mark W. Young, and Cathy Hawes. 2021. "Solar Radiation Flux Provides a Method of Quantifying Weed-Crop Balance in Present and Future Climates" Plants 10, no. 12: 2657. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10122657

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop