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Open AccessArticle

Geointelligence against Illegal Deforestation and Timber Laundering in the Brazilian Amazon

1
Social Sustainability and Development (SSD), Universidade Aberta, 1269-001 Lisboa, Portugal
2
Commissioner of Federal Police, 70610-902 Brasília, Brazil
3
Department of Sciences and Technology, Universidade Aberta, 1269-001 Lisboa, Portugal
4
NOVA Information Management School, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 1070-312 Lisboa, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2020, 9(6), 398; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi9060398
Received: 15 April 2020 / Revised: 6 June 2020 / Accepted: 14 June 2020 / Published: 17 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Using GIS to Improve (Public) Safety and Security)
Due to the characteristics of the Southern Amazonas Mesoregion (Mesorregião Sul do Amazonas, MSA), conducting on-site surveys in all licensed forestry areas (Plano de Manejo Florestal, PMFS) is an impossible task. Therefore, the present investigation aimed to: (i) analyze the use of geointelligence (GEOINT) techniques to support the evaluation of PMFS; and (ii) verify if the PMFS located in the MSA are being executed in accordance with Brazilian legislation. A set of twenty-two evaluation criteria were established. These were initially applied to a “standard” PMFS and subsequently replicated to a larger area of 83 PMFS, located in the MSA. GEOINT allowed for a better understanding of each PMFS, identifying illegal forestry activities and evidence of timber laundering. Among these results, we highlight the following evidences: (i) inconsistencies related to total transport time and prices declared to the authorities (48% of PMFS); (ii) volumetric information incompatible with official forest inventories and/or not conforming with Benford’s law (37% of PMFS); (iii) signs of exploitation outside the authorized polygon limits (35% PMFS) and signs of clear-cutting (29% of PMFS); (iv) no signs of infrastructure compatible with licensed forestry (17% of PMFS); and (v) signs of exploitation prior to the licensing (13% of PMFS) and after the expiration of licensing (3%). View Full-Text
Keywords: amazon; Benford’s law; deforestation; forestry management; geointelligence; organized crime; PMFS; RADAM; SisDOF; timber laundering amazon; Benford’s law; deforestation; forestry management; geointelligence; organized crime; PMFS; RADAM; SisDOF; timber laundering
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Perazzoni, F.; Bacelar-Nicolau, P.; Painho, M. Geointelligence against Illegal Deforestation and Timber Laundering in the Brazilian Amazon. ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2020, 9, 398.

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