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ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2018, 7(9), 381; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi7090381

Using Remote Sensing to Analyse Net Land-Use Change from Conflicting Sustainability Policies: The Case of Amsterdam

Department of Human Geography, Planning and International Development Studies, Amsterdam Institute of Social Science Research, University of Amsterdam, 1018 WZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands
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Received: 28 July 2018 / Revised: 4 September 2018 / Accepted: 11 September 2018 / Published: 19 September 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geo-Information and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs))
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Abstract

In order to achieve the ambitious Sustainable Development Goal #11 (Sustainable Cities and Communities), an integrative approach is necessary. Complex outcomes such as sustainable cities are the product of a range of policies and drivers that are sometimes at odds with each other. Yet, traditional policy assessments often focus on specific ambitions such as housing, green spaces, etc., and are blind to the consequences of policy interactions. This research proposes the use of remote sensing technologies to monitor and analyse the resultant effects of opposing urban policies. In particular, we will look at the conflicting policy goals in Amsterdam between the policy to densify, on the one hand, and, on the other hand, goals of protecting and improving urban green space. We conducted an analysis to detect changes in land-uses within the urban core of Amsterdam, using satellite images from 2003 and 2016. The results indeed show a decrease of green space and an increase in the built-up environment. In addition, we reveal strong fragmentation of green space, indicating that green space is increasingly available in smaller patches. These results illustrate that the urban green space policies of the municipality appear insufficient to mitigate the negative outcomes of the city’s densification on urban green space. Additionally, we demonstrate how remote sensing can be a valuable instrument in investigating the net consequences of policies and urban developments that would be difficult to monitor through traditional policy assessments. View Full-Text
Keywords: urban green space; policy analysis; densification; resilience; Amsterdam; sustainability; SDGs urban green space; policy analysis; densification; resilience; Amsterdam; sustainability; SDGs
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Giezen, M.; Balikci, S.; Arundel, R. Using Remote Sensing to Analyse Net Land-Use Change from Conflicting Sustainability Policies: The Case of Amsterdam. ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2018, 7, 381.

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