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Article

3D Visibility Analysis for Evaluating the Attractiveness of Tourism Routes Computed from Social Media Photos

1
Mapping and Geo-Information Engineering, Civil and Environmental Engineering Faculty, Technion—Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 3200003, Israel
2
Architecture and Town Planning, Technion—Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 3200003, Israel
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Yeran Sun and Wolfgang Kainz
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2021, 10(5), 275; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi10050275
Received: 1 March 2021 / Revised: 18 April 2021 / Accepted: 19 April 2021 / Published: 23 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geovisualization and Social Media)
Social media is used nowadays for various location-based applications and services, aspiring to use the vast and timely potential of user-generated content. To evaluate the correctness, reliability and potential of these applications and services, they are mostly evaluated in terms of optimization or compared to existing authoritative data sources and services. With respect to route planning, criterion optimization is mostly implemented to evaluate the service effectiveness, in terms of, e.g., length, time or visited places. These evaluations are mostly limited in their effectiveness at presenting the complete experience of the route, since they are limited to a predefined criterion and are mostly implemented in two-dimensional space. In this research, we propose a comprehensive evaluation process, in which a tourism walking route is analyzed with respect to three-dimensional visibility that measures the attractiveness of the route relating to the user perception. To present our development, we showcase the use of Flickr, a social media photo-sharing online website that is popular among travelers that share their tourism experiences. We use Flickr photos to generate tourism walking routes and evaluate them in terms of the visible space. We show that the 3D visibility analysis identifies the various visible urban elements in the vicinity of the tourism routes, which are more attractive, scenery and include many tourism attractions. Since urban attractivity is often reflected in the photo-trails of Flickr photographers, we argue that using 3D visibility analysis that measures urban attractiveness and scenery should be considered for the purpose of analysis and evaluation of location-based services. View Full-Text
Keywords: social media; geotagged photos; geovisualization; urban attractivity; visual analysis social media; geotagged photos; geovisualization; urban attractivity; visual analysis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mor, M.; Fisher-Gewirtzman, D.; Yosifof, R.; Dalyot, S. 3D Visibility Analysis for Evaluating the Attractiveness of Tourism Routes Computed from Social Media Photos. ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2021, 10, 275. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi10050275

AMA Style

Mor M, Fisher-Gewirtzman D, Yosifof R, Dalyot S. 3D Visibility Analysis for Evaluating the Attractiveness of Tourism Routes Computed from Social Media Photos. ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information. 2021; 10(5):275. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi10050275

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mor, Matan, Dafna Fisher-Gewirtzman, Roei Yosifof, and Sagi Dalyot. 2021. "3D Visibility Analysis for Evaluating the Attractiveness of Tourism Routes Computed from Social Media Photos" ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information 10, no. 5: 275. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi10050275

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