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Open AccessArticle

Untargetted Metabolomic Exploration of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Stress Response to Cinnamon Essential Oil

1
Chair and Department of Pharmacognosy, Medical University of Lublin, Chodzki 1, 20-093 Lublin, Poland
2
Chair and Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Medical University of Lublin, Chodzki 1, 20-093 Lublin, Poland
3
Group of Plant Cell Biotechnology and Metabolomics, The Stephan Angeloff Institute of Microbiology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 139 Ruski Blvd., 4000 Plovdiv, Bulgaria
4
Center of Plant Systems Biology and Biotechnology, 4000 Plovdiv, Bulgaria
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Biomolecules 2020, 10(3), 357; https://doi.org/10.3390/biom10030357
Received: 6 January 2020 / Revised: 20 February 2020 / Accepted: 24 February 2020 / Published: 26 February 2020
The antimycobacterial activity of cinnamaldehyde has already been proven for laboratory strains and for clinical isolates. What is more, cinnamaldehyde was shown to threaten the mycobacterial plasma membrane integrity and to activate the stress response system. Following promising applications of metabolomics in drug discovery and development we aimed to explore the mycobacteria response to cinnamaldehyde within cinnamon essential oil treatment by untargeted liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. The use of predictive metabolite pathway analysis and description of produced lipids enabled the evaluation of the stress symptoms shown by bacteria. This study suggests that bacteria exposed to cinnamaldehyde could reorganize their outer membrane as a physical barrier against stress factors. They probably lowered cell wall permeability and inner membrane fluidity, and possibly redirected carbon flow to store energy in triacylglycerols. Being a reactive compound, cinnamaldehyde may also contribute to disturbances in bacteria redox homeostasis and detoxification mechanisms. View Full-Text
Keywords: LC-MS; metabolic pathways; mycobacterial lipids; metabolomics LC-MS; metabolic pathways; mycobacterial lipids; metabolomics
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sieniawska, E.; Sawicki, R.; Golus, J.; Georgiev, M.I. Untargetted Metabolomic Exploration of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Stress Response to Cinnamon Essential Oil. Biomolecules 2020, 10, 357.

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