Next Article in Journal
Did the Physical and Psychological States of Outpatients Receiving Rehabilitation at a Geriatric Health Services Facility Decline during the State of Emergency Caused by the COVID-19 Pandemic?
Previous Article in Journal
The Emotion of Disgust among Medical and Psychology Students
Open AccessReview

Can Melatonin Be a Potential “Silver Bullet” in Treating COVID-19 Patients?

1
Faculty of Medical Sciences, Pontificia Universidad Católica Argentina, Buenos Aires 1007, Argentina
2
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5T 1R8, Canada
3
Somnogen Canada Inc., College Street, Toronto, ON M6H 1C5, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Diseases 2020, 8(4), 44; https://doi.org/10.3390/diseases8040044
Received: 4 November 2020 / Revised: 24 November 2020 / Accepted: 24 November 2020 / Published: 26 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Melatonin Based Therapies)
The therapeutic potential of melatonin as a chronobiotic cytoprotective agent to counteract the consequences of COVID-19 infections has been advocated. Because of its wide-ranging effects as an antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulatory compound, melatonin could be unique in impairing the consequences of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Moreover, indirect evidence points out to a possible antiviral action of melatonin by interfering with SARS-CoV-2/angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 association. Melatonin is also an effective chronobiotic agent to reverse the circadian disruption of social isolation and to control delirium in severely affected patients. As a cytoprotector, melatonin serves to combat several comorbidities such as diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and ischemic and non-ischemic cardiovascular diseases, which aggravate COVID-19 disease. In view of evidence on the occurrence of neurological sequels in COVID-19-infected patients, another putative application of melatonin emerges based on its neuroprotective properties. Since melatonin is an effective means to control cognitive decay in minimal cognitive impairment, its therapeutic significance for the neurological sequels of SARS-CoV-2 infection should be considered. Finally, yet importantly, exogenous melatonin can be an adjuvant capable of augmenting the efficacy of anti-SARS-CoV-2 vaccines. We discuss in this review the experimental evidence suggesting that melatonin is a potential “silver bullet” in the COVID 19 pandemic. View Full-Text
Keywords: aging; anti-SARS-CoV-2 vaccination; chronotherapy; COVID-19 pandemic; cytoprotection; diabetes; inflammation; metabolic syndrome; melatonin; cognitive impairment; neurodegeneration; oxidative stress; renin–angiotensin system aging; anti-SARS-CoV-2 vaccination; chronotherapy; COVID-19 pandemic; cytoprotection; diabetes; inflammation; metabolic syndrome; melatonin; cognitive impairment; neurodegeneration; oxidative stress; renin–angiotensin system
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Cardinali, D.P.; Brown, G.M.; Pandi-Perumal, S.R. Can Melatonin Be a Potential “Silver Bullet” in Treating COVID-19 Patients? Diseases 2020, 8, 44.

AMA Style

Cardinali DP, Brown GM, Pandi-Perumal SR. Can Melatonin Be a Potential “Silver Bullet” in Treating COVID-19 Patients? Diseases. 2020; 8(4):44.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Cardinali, Daniel P.; Brown, Gregory M.; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R. 2020. "Can Melatonin Be a Potential “Silver Bullet” in Treating COVID-19 Patients?" Diseases 8, no. 4: 44.

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop