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Review

Quercetin: A Molecule of Great Biochemical and Clinical Value and Its Beneficial Effect on Diabetes and Cancer

Department of Nutritional Sciences and Dietetics, School of Health Sciences, International Hellenic University (IHU), P.O. Box 141, Sindos, 57400 Thessaloniki, Greece
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Academic Editors: Marwan El Ghoch and Agnes Ayton
Diseases 2022, 10(3), 37; https://doi.org/10.3390/diseases10030037
Received: 31 May 2022 / Revised: 24 June 2022 / Accepted: 27 June 2022 / Published: 29 June 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Relationship between Nutrition and Diseases)
Quercetin belongs to the broader category of polyphenols. It is found, in particular, among the flavonols, and along with kaempferol, myricetin and isorhamnetin, it is recognized as a foreign substance after ingestion in contrast to vitamins. Quercetin occurs mainly linked to sugars with the most common compounds being quercetin-3-O-glucoside or as an aglycone, especially in the plant population. The aim of this review is to present a recent bibliography on the mechanisms of quercetin absorption and metabolism, bioavailability, and antioxidant and the clinical effects in diabetes and cancer. The literature reports a positive effect of quercetin on oxidative stress, cancer, and the regulation of blood sugar levels. Moreover, research-administered drug dosages of up to 2000 mg per day showed mild to no symptoms of overdose. It should be noted that quercetin is no longer considered a carcinogenic substance. The daily intake of quercetin in the diet ranges 10 mg–500 mg, depending on the type of products consumed. This review highlights that quercetin is a valuable dietary antioxidant, although a specific daily recommended intake for this substance has not yet been determined and further studies are required to decide a beneficial concentration threshold. View Full-Text
Keywords: quercetin; flavonol; antioxidant; diabetes; cancer quercetin; flavonol; antioxidant; diabetes; cancer
MDPI and ACS Style

Michala, A.-S.; Pritsa, A. Quercetin: A Molecule of Great Biochemical and Clinical Value and Its Beneficial Effect on Diabetes and Cancer. Diseases 2022, 10, 37. https://doi.org/10.3390/diseases10030037

AMA Style

Michala A-S, Pritsa A. Quercetin: A Molecule of Great Biochemical and Clinical Value and Its Beneficial Effect on Diabetes and Cancer. Diseases. 2022; 10(3):37. https://doi.org/10.3390/diseases10030037

Chicago/Turabian Style

Michala, Aikaterini-Spyridoula, and Agathi Pritsa. 2022. "Quercetin: A Molecule of Great Biochemical and Clinical Value and Its Beneficial Effect on Diabetes and Cancer" Diseases 10, no. 3: 37. https://doi.org/10.3390/diseases10030037

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