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Article

From Fragmented to Joint Responsibilities: Barriers and Opportunities for Adaptive Water Quality Governance in California’s Urban-Agricultural Interface

Department of Environmental Studies & Sciences, Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, CA 95053, USA
Resources 2018, 7(1), 22; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources7010022
Received: 4 December 2017 / Revised: 1 March 2018 / Accepted: 7 March 2018 / Published: 17 March 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Water Regimes)
California is facing a critical water supply and water quality crisis, necessitating a clear shift in the way water resources are managed. This study assesses the effectiveness of water law and policy in the urban-agricultural interface, where the two discharge into common waterways but have different regulatory requirements. A case study from one of California’s most productive agricultural regions, the Salinas Valley, explores the complexities and inadequacies of current water law in the interface, as well as promising integrated water management schemes. The article’s findings are based on archival research, extensive document review and 15 in-depth interviews with key stakeholders. Findings suggest that local, state and federal water policy is severely fragmented, providing little incentive for the multitude of water entities to collaborate on multi-benefit projects and resulting in unsuccessful water quality improvements. There is a strong need for a more integrated policy approach that bridges different types of dischargers (agricultural and urban), water quality and water quantity issues and also incorporates land uses into policy decision making. View Full-Text
Keywords: water law and policy; water resource management; urban-agricultural interface; California water law and policy; water resource management; urban-agricultural interface; California
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MDPI and ACS Style

Drevno, A. From Fragmented to Joint Responsibilities: Barriers and Opportunities for Adaptive Water Quality Governance in California’s Urban-Agricultural Interface. Resources 2018, 7, 22. https://doi.org/10.3390/resources7010022

AMA Style

Drevno A. From Fragmented to Joint Responsibilities: Barriers and Opportunities for Adaptive Water Quality Governance in California’s Urban-Agricultural Interface. Resources. 2018; 7(1):22. https://doi.org/10.3390/resources7010022

Chicago/Turabian Style

Drevno, Ann. 2018. "From Fragmented to Joint Responsibilities: Barriers and Opportunities for Adaptive Water Quality Governance in California’s Urban-Agricultural Interface" Resources 7, no. 1: 22. https://doi.org/10.3390/resources7010022

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