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Article

The Impact of Future Offshore Wind Farms on Wind Power Generation in Great Britain

1
Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, Reading RG6 6BB, UK
2
National Centre for Atmospheric Science, Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, Reading RG6 6BB, UK
3
School of Construction Management and Engineering, University of Reading, Reading RG6 6AW, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Simon J. Watson
Resources 2015, 4(1), 155-171; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources4010155
Received: 1 December 2014 / Revised: 13 February 2015 / Accepted: 9 March 2015 / Published: 17 March 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Spatial and Temporal Variation of the Wind Resource)
In the coming years the geographical distribution of wind farms in Great Britain is expected to change significantly. Following the development of the “round 3” wind zones (circa 2025), most of the installed capacity will be located in large offshore wind farms. However, the impact of this change in wind-farm distribution on the characteristics of national wind generation is largely unknown. This study uses a 34-year reanalysis dataset (Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) from National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (NASA-GMAO)) to produce a synthetic hourly time series of GB-aggregated wind generation based on: (1) the “current” wind farm distribution; and (2) a “future” wind farm distribution scenario. The derived data are used to estimate a climatology of extreme wind power events in Great Britain for each wind farm distribution. The impact of the changing wind farm distribution on the wind-power statistics is significant. The annual mean capacity factor increased from 32.7% for the current wind farm distribution to 39.7% for the future distribution. In addition, there are fewer periods of prolonged low generation and more periods of prolonged high generation. Finally, the frequency and magnitude of ramping in the nationally aggregated capacity factor remains largely unchanged. However, due to the increased capacity of the future distribution, in terms of power output, the magnitude of the ramping increases by a factor of 5. View Full-Text
Keywords: offshore wind power; wind power extremes; ramping; persistence; wind integration offshore wind power; wind power extremes; ramping; persistence; wind integration
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MDPI and ACS Style

Drew, D.R.; Cannon, D.J.; Brayshaw, D.J.; Barlow, J.F.; Coker, P.J. The Impact of Future Offshore Wind Farms on Wind Power Generation in Great Britain. Resources 2015, 4, 155-171. https://doi.org/10.3390/resources4010155

AMA Style

Drew DR, Cannon DJ, Brayshaw DJ, Barlow JF, Coker PJ. The Impact of Future Offshore Wind Farms on Wind Power Generation in Great Britain. Resources. 2015; 4(1):155-171. https://doi.org/10.3390/resources4010155

Chicago/Turabian Style

Drew, Daniel R., Dirk J. Cannon, David J. Brayshaw, Janet F. Barlow, and Phil J. Coker. 2015. "The Impact of Future Offshore Wind Farms on Wind Power Generation in Great Britain" Resources 4, no. 1: 155-171. https://doi.org/10.3390/resources4010155

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